Identifying psychosocial and social correlates of sexually transmitted diseases among black female teenagers

Joan Marie Kraft, Maura K. Whiteman, Marion W. Carter, M. Christine Snead, Ralph DiClemente, Collen Crittenden Murray, Kendra Hatfield-Timajchy, Melissa Kottke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Black teenagers have relatively high rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and recent research suggests the role of contextual factors, as well as risk behaviors.We explore the role of 4 categories of risk and protective factors on having a biologically confirmed STD among black, female teenagers. Methods: Black teenage girls (14-19 years old) accessing services at a publicly funded family planning clinic provided a urine specimen for STD testing and completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview that assessed the following: risk behaviors, relationship characteristics, social factors, and psychosocial factors. We examined bivariate associations between each risk and protective factor and having gonorrhea and/or chlamydia, as well as multivariate logistic regression among 339 black female teenagers. Results: More than one-fourth (26.5%) of participants had either gonorrhea and/or chlamydia. In multivariate analyses, having initiated sex before age 15 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.87) and having concurrent sex partners in the past 6 months (aOR, 1.55) were positively associated with having an STD. Living with her father (aOR, 0.44), believing that an STD is theworst thing that could happen (aOR, 0.50), and believing shewould feel dirty and embarrassed about an STD (aOR, 0.44) were negatively associated with having an STD. Conclusions: Social factors and attitudes toward STDs and select risk behaviors were associated with the risk for STDs, suggesting the need for interventions that address more distal factors. Future studies should investigate how such factors influence safer sexual behaviors and the risk for STDs among black female teenagers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-197
Number of pages6
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Odds Ratio
Risk-Taking
Chlamydia
Gonorrhea
Family Planning Services
Fathers
Sexual Behavior
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Urine
Interviews
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Identifying psychosocial and social correlates of sexually transmitted diseases among black female teenagers. / Kraft, Joan Marie; Whiteman, Maura K.; Carter, Marion W.; Snead, M. Christine; DiClemente, Ralph; Murray, Collen Crittenden; Hatfield-Timajchy, Kendra; Kottke, Melissa.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 42, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 192-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kraft, JM, Whiteman, MK, Carter, MW, Snead, MC, DiClemente, R, Murray, CC, Hatfield-Timajchy, K & Kottke, M 2015, 'Identifying psychosocial and social correlates of sexually transmitted diseases among black female teenagers', Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 192-197. https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000254
Kraft, Joan Marie ; Whiteman, Maura K. ; Carter, Marion W. ; Snead, M. Christine ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Murray, Collen Crittenden ; Hatfield-Timajchy, Kendra ; Kottke, Melissa. / Identifying psychosocial and social correlates of sexually transmitted diseases among black female teenagers. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 192-197.
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