I know who my friends are, but do you? Predictors of self-reported and peer-inferred relationships

Jennifer Watling Neal, Zachary P. Neal, Elise Cappella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using social network data, this study examines which features of social and spatial proximity predict self-reported, or "real," and peer-reported, or "inferred," relationships among 2,695 pairwise combinations of African American second- through fourth-grade students (aged 7-11). Relationships were more likely to exist, and more likely to be inferred to exist by peers, between pairs of children who were the same sex, sat near one another, shared a positive academic orientation, or shared athletic ability. Sex similarity had a dramatically larger effect on peers' inferences about relationships than on self-reported real relationships, suggesting that children overestimate the importance of gender in their inferences about relationships. Results were stable across different grade levels in middle childhood and for boys and girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1366-1372
Number of pages7
JournalChild Development
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Social Support
African Americans
Sports
social network
school grade
childhood
Students
gender
ability
student
American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

I know who my friends are, but do you? Predictors of self-reported and peer-inferred relationships. / Neal, Jennifer Watling; Neal, Zachary P.; Cappella, Elise.

In: Child Development, Vol. 85, No. 4, 2014, p. 1366-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neal, Jennifer Watling ; Neal, Zachary P. ; Cappella, Elise. / I know who my friends are, but do you? Predictors of self-reported and peer-inferred relationships. In: Child Development. 2014 ; Vol. 85, No. 4. pp. 1366-1372.
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