I. Comparing use of public and private mental health services

The enduring barriers of race and age

Marvin S. Swartz, H. Ryan Wagner, Jeffrey W. Swanson, Barbara J. Burns, Linda K. George, Deborah K. Padgett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Data from the NIMH-Epidemiologic Catchment Area Project were used to predict differential use of private versus public outpatient mental health services, a salient concern in integrating public and private services in market-based health care reform efforts. Having a recent psychiatric disorder, being age 25-44, female, white, of higher educational level, and unmarried increase the odds of any mental health service use. However, odds of treatment in the public sector are increased for males, African Americans, those with low educational and income levels, and odds are markedly decreased for the elderly, suggesting significant barriers to care for these mentally ill subpopulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-144
Number of pages12
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Mental Health Services
health service
mental health
National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.)
Health Care Reform
Public Sector
Mentally Ill Persons
Ambulatory Care
African Americans
Psychiatry
public sector
health care
income
reform
market
Therapeutics
American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

I. Comparing use of public and private mental health services : The enduring barriers of race and age. / Swartz, Marvin S.; Wagner, H. Ryan; Swanson, Jeffrey W.; Burns, Barbara J.; George, Linda K.; Padgett, Deborah K.

In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 34, No. 2, 1998, p. 133-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Swartz, Marvin S. ; Wagner, H. Ryan ; Swanson, Jeffrey W. ; Burns, Barbara J. ; George, Linda K. ; Padgett, Deborah K. / I. Comparing use of public and private mental health services : The enduring barriers of race and age. In: Community Mental Health Journal. 1998 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 133-144.
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