Human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is not necessary for spatial working memory

Wayne E. Mackey, Orrin Devinsky, Werner K. Doyle, Michael R. Meager, Clayton Curtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A dominant theory, based on electrophysiological and lesion evidence from nonhuman primate studies, posits that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stores and maintains working memory (WM) representations. Yet, neuroimaging studies have consistently failed to translate these results to humans; these studies normally find that neural activity persists in the human precentral sulcus (PCS) during WM delays. Here, we attempt to resolve this discrepancy. To test the degree to which dlPFC is necessary for WM, we compared the performance of patients with dlPFC lesions and neurologically healthy controls on a memory-guided saccade task that was used in the monkey studies to measure spatial WM. We found that dlPFC damage only impairs the accuracy of memory-guided saccades if the damage impacts the PCS; lesions to dorsolateral dlPFC that spare the PCS have no effect on WM. These results identify the necessary subregion of the frontal cortex forWMand specify how this influential animal model of human cognition must be revised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2847-2856
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 9 2016

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Short-Term Memory
Saccades
Frontal Lobe
Neuroimaging
Cognition
Primates
Haplorhini
Animal Models
Spatial Memory

Keywords

  • Frontal eye field
  • Human
  • Lesion
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Saccade
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is not necessary for spatial working memory. / Mackey, Wayne E.; Devinsky, Orrin; Doyle, Werner K.; Meager, Michael R.; Curtis, Clayton.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 36, No. 10, 09.03.2016, p. 2847-2856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackey, Wayne E. ; Devinsky, Orrin ; Doyle, Werner K. ; Meager, Michael R. ; Curtis, Clayton. / Human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is not necessary for spatial working memory. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 10. pp. 2847-2856.
@article{48ab64380aa341f2bee252cd5a47e685,
title = "Human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is not necessary for spatial working memory",
abstract = "A dominant theory, based on electrophysiological and lesion evidence from nonhuman primate studies, posits that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stores and maintains working memory (WM) representations. Yet, neuroimaging studies have consistently failed to translate these results to humans; these studies normally find that neural activity persists in the human precentral sulcus (PCS) during WM delays. Here, we attempt to resolve this discrepancy. To test the degree to which dlPFC is necessary for WM, we compared the performance of patients with dlPFC lesions and neurologically healthy controls on a memory-guided saccade task that was used in the monkey studies to measure spatial WM. We found that dlPFC damage only impairs the accuracy of memory-guided saccades if the damage impacts the PCS; lesions to dorsolateral dlPFC that spare the PCS have no effect on WM. These results identify the necessary subregion of the frontal cortex forWMand specify how this influential animal model of human cognition must be revised.",
keywords = "Frontal eye field, Human, Lesion, Prefrontal cortex, Saccade, Working memory",
author = "Mackey, {Wayne E.} and Orrin Devinsky and Doyle, {Werner K.} and Meager, {Michael R.} and Clayton Curtis",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3618-15.2016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "2847--2856",
journal = "Journal of Neuroscience",
issn = "0270-6474",
publisher = "Society for Neuroscience",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is not necessary for spatial working memory

AU - Mackey, Wayne E.

AU - Devinsky, Orrin

AU - Doyle, Werner K.

AU - Meager, Michael R.

AU - Curtis, Clayton

PY - 2016/3/9

Y1 - 2016/3/9

N2 - A dominant theory, based on electrophysiological and lesion evidence from nonhuman primate studies, posits that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stores and maintains working memory (WM) representations. Yet, neuroimaging studies have consistently failed to translate these results to humans; these studies normally find that neural activity persists in the human precentral sulcus (PCS) during WM delays. Here, we attempt to resolve this discrepancy. To test the degree to which dlPFC is necessary for WM, we compared the performance of patients with dlPFC lesions and neurologically healthy controls on a memory-guided saccade task that was used in the monkey studies to measure spatial WM. We found that dlPFC damage only impairs the accuracy of memory-guided saccades if the damage impacts the PCS; lesions to dorsolateral dlPFC that spare the PCS have no effect on WM. These results identify the necessary subregion of the frontal cortex forWMand specify how this influential animal model of human cognition must be revised.

AB - A dominant theory, based on electrophysiological and lesion evidence from nonhuman primate studies, posits that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stores and maintains working memory (WM) representations. Yet, neuroimaging studies have consistently failed to translate these results to humans; these studies normally find that neural activity persists in the human precentral sulcus (PCS) during WM delays. Here, we attempt to resolve this discrepancy. To test the degree to which dlPFC is necessary for WM, we compared the performance of patients with dlPFC lesions and neurologically healthy controls on a memory-guided saccade task that was used in the monkey studies to measure spatial WM. We found that dlPFC damage only impairs the accuracy of memory-guided saccades if the damage impacts the PCS; lesions to dorsolateral dlPFC that spare the PCS have no effect on WM. These results identify the necessary subregion of the frontal cortex forWMand specify how this influential animal model of human cognition must be revised.

KW - Frontal eye field

KW - Human

KW - Lesion

KW - Prefrontal cortex

KW - Saccade

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84960463074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84960463074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3618-15.2016

DO - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3618-15.2016

M3 - Article

C2 - 26961941

AN - SCOPUS:84960463074

VL - 36

SP - 2847

EP - 2856

JO - Journal of Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0270-6474

IS - 10

ER -