HSV-2 serologic testing in an HMO population

Uptake and psychosocial sequelae

Julie Richards, Delia Scholes, Selin Caka, Linda Drolette, Amalia Meier Magaret, Patty Yarbro, William Lafferty, Richard Crosby, Ralph DiClemente, Anna Wald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To prospectively measure the uptake of Herpes simplex virus Type 2 (HSV-2) testing and psychosocial response to a new serologic diagnosis of HSV-2 in a health maintenance organization (HMO) population. STUDY DESIGN: Randomly selected urban HMO enrollees were invited to be tested for HSV-2 antibody at a research clinic. Participants had blood drawn and completed demographic and psychosocial questionnaires. RESULTS: Of 3111 eligible enrollees contacted, 344 (11%) were tested. Eighty-seven (26%) tested HSV-2 seropositive, and 44 (51%) of these did not report a prior genital herpes diagnosis. Distress, measured by the total mood disturbance, was 6.5 points higher on average following a new genital herpes diagnosis relative to baseline (actual range = 109 points, P = 0.003) but not statistically different from HSV-2 negative or previously diagnosed participants. CONCLUSIONS: HMO enrollees unexpectedly testing HSV-2 positive showed short-term psychosocial distress that resolved during 6-month follow-up. Findings suggest that concerns about psychosocial burden should not deter voluntary serologic HSV-2 testing in primary care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-725
Number of pages8
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume34
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Human Herpesvirus 2
Health Maintenance Organizations
Population
Herpes Genitalis
Urban Health
Primary Health Care
Demography
Antibodies
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Richards, J., Scholes, D., Caka, S., Drolette, L., Magaret, A. M., Yarbro, P., ... Wald, A. (2007). HSV-2 serologic testing in an HMO population: Uptake and psychosocial sequelae. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 34(9), 718-725. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.olq.0000261455.60955.59

HSV-2 serologic testing in an HMO population : Uptake and psychosocial sequelae. / Richards, Julie; Scholes, Delia; Caka, Selin; Drolette, Linda; Magaret, Amalia Meier; Yarbro, Patty; Lafferty, William; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph; Wald, Anna.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 34, No. 9, 01.09.2007, p. 718-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richards, J, Scholes, D, Caka, S, Drolette, L, Magaret, AM, Yarbro, P, Lafferty, W, Crosby, R, DiClemente, R & Wald, A 2007, 'HSV-2 serologic testing in an HMO population: Uptake and psychosocial sequelae', Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 34, no. 9, pp. 718-725. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.olq.0000261455.60955.59
Richards, Julie ; Scholes, Delia ; Caka, Selin ; Drolette, Linda ; Magaret, Amalia Meier ; Yarbro, Patty ; Lafferty, William ; Crosby, Richard ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wald, Anna. / HSV-2 serologic testing in an HMO population : Uptake and psychosocial sequelae. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 9. pp. 718-725.
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