HPV vaccination: Are we initiating too late?

Annika M. Hofstetter, Melissa S. Stockwell, Noor Al-Husayni, Danielle Ompad, Karthik Natarajan, Susan L. Rosenthal, Karen Soren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended in early adolescence. While limited data suggest that patients frequently delay initiation of the three-dose series, age-based variability in initiation of HPV vaccination and its clinical relevance are not well described. Thus, this study aims to characterize HPV vaccination delay among adolescent and young adult females. Methods: This retrospective cohort study examined age at HPV vaccination initiation and missed opportunities for receipt of the first vaccine dose (HPV1) among 11-26 year-old females (n=22,900) receiving care at 16 urban academically-affiliated ambulatory care clinics between 2007 and 2011. Predictors of timely vaccination and post-licensure trends in age at HPV1 receipt were assessed using multivariable logistic regression and a generalized linear mixed model, respectively. Chlamydia trachomatis and Papanicolaou screening before HPV vaccination initiation, as markers of prior sexual experience and associated morbidity, were examined in a subcohort of subjects (n=15,049). Results: The proportion of 11-12 year-olds who initiated HPV vaccination increased over time (44.4% [2007] vs. 74.5% [2011], p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1939-1945
Number of pages7
JournalVaccine
Volume32
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2014

Fingerprint

Papillomaviridae
Vaccination
vaccination
adolescence
Chlamydia trachomatis
Licensure
Ambulatory Care
dosage
cohort studies
young adults
morbidity
Young Adult
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Vaccines
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
vaccines
screening
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Chlamydia
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Initiation
  • Papanicolaou
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Hofstetter, A. M., Stockwell, M. S., Al-Husayni, N., Ompad, D., Natarajan, K., Rosenthal, S. L., & Soren, K. (2014). HPV vaccination: Are we initiating too late? Vaccine, 32(17), 1939-1945. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.01.084

HPV vaccination : Are we initiating too late? / Hofstetter, Annika M.; Stockwell, Melissa S.; Al-Husayni, Noor; Ompad, Danielle; Natarajan, Karthik; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Soren, Karen.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 32, No. 17, 07.04.2014, p. 1939-1945.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hofstetter, AM, Stockwell, MS, Al-Husayni, N, Ompad, D, Natarajan, K, Rosenthal, SL & Soren, K 2014, 'HPV vaccination: Are we initiating too late?', Vaccine, vol. 32, no. 17, pp. 1939-1945. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.01.084
Hofstetter AM, Stockwell MS, Al-Husayni N, Ompad D, Natarajan K, Rosenthal SL et al. HPV vaccination: Are we initiating too late? Vaccine. 2014 Apr 7;32(17):1939-1945. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.01.084
Hofstetter, Annika M. ; Stockwell, Melissa S. ; Al-Husayni, Noor ; Ompad, Danielle ; Natarajan, Karthik ; Rosenthal, Susan L. ; Soren, Karen. / HPV vaccination : Are we initiating too late?. In: Vaccine. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 17. pp. 1939-1945.
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