How welfare policies affect adolescents' school outcomes: A synthesis of evidence from experimental studies

Lisa Gennetian, Greg Duncan, Virginia Knox, Wanda Vargas, Elizabeth Clark-Kauffman, Andrew S. London

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Using data from 8 random assignment studies and employing meta-analytic techniques, this article provides systematic evidence that welfare and work policies targeted at low-income parents have small adverse effects on some school outcomes among adolescents ages 12 to 18 years at follow-up. These adverse effects were observed mostly for school performance outcomes and occurred in programs that required mothers to work or participate in employment-related activities and those that encouraged mothers to work voluntarily. The most pronounced negative effects on school outcomes occurred for the group of adolescents who had a younger sibling, possibly because of the increased home and sibling care responsibilities they assumed as their mothers increased their employment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-423
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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social policy
Mothers
adolescent
Siblings
school
evidence
Home Care Services
parents
low income
Parents
welfare
responsibility
performance
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

How welfare policies affect adolescents' school outcomes : A synthesis of evidence from experimental studies. / Gennetian, Lisa; Duncan, Greg; Knox, Virginia; Vargas, Wanda; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth; London, Andrew S.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 399-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gennetian, Lisa ; Duncan, Greg ; Knox, Virginia ; Vargas, Wanda ; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth ; London, Andrew S. / How welfare policies affect adolescents' school outcomes : A synthesis of evidence from experimental studies. In: Journal of Research on Adolescence. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 399-423.
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