How to place a point to maximize angles

Boris Aronov, Mark V. Yagnatinsky

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    We describe a randomized algorithm that, given a set of points in the plane, computes the best location to insert a new point, such that the Delaunay triangulation of the resulting point set has the largest possible minimum angle. The expected running time of our algorithm is at most cubic on any input, improving the roughly quartic time of the best previously known algorithm.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationCCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry
    PublisherCanadian Conference on Computational Geometry
    Pages259-263
    Number of pages5
    StatePublished - 2013
    Event25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, CCCG 2013 - Waterloo, Canada
    Duration: Aug 8 2013Aug 10 2013

    Other

    Other25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, CCCG 2013
    CountryCanada
    CityWaterloo
    Period8/8/138/10/13

    Fingerprint

    Maximise
    Angle
    Delaunay triangulation
    Randomized Algorithms
    Quartic
    Point Sets
    Set of points
    Triangulation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geometry and Topology
    • Computational Mathematics

    Cite this

    Aronov, B., & Yagnatinsky, M. V. (2013). How to place a point to maximize angles. In CCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry (pp. 259-263). Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry.

    How to place a point to maximize angles. / Aronov, Boris; Yagnatinsky, Mark V.

    CCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry. Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, 2013. p. 259-263.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Aronov, B & Yagnatinsky, MV 2013, How to place a point to maximize angles. in CCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry. Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, pp. 259-263, 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, CCCG 2013, Waterloo, Canada, 8/8/13.
    Aronov B, Yagnatinsky MV. How to place a point to maximize angles. In CCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry. Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry. 2013. p. 259-263
    Aronov, Boris ; Yagnatinsky, Mark V. / How to place a point to maximize angles. CCCG 2013 - 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry. Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry, 2013. pp. 259-263
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