How retrotransposons shape genome regulation

Paolo Mita, Jef D. Boeke

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    Retrotransposons are mutagenic units able to move within the genome. Despite many defenses deployed by the host to suppress potentially harmful activities of retrotransposons, these genetic units have found ways to meld with normal cellular functions through processes of exaptation and domestication. The same host mechanisms targeting transposon mobility allow for expansion and rewiring of gene regulatory networks on an evolutionary time scale. Recent works demonstrating retrotransposon activity during development, cell differentiation and neurogenesis shed new light on unexpected activities of transposable elements. Moreover, new technological advances illuminated subtler nuances of the complex relationship between retrotransposons and the host genome, clarifying the role of retroelements in evolution, development and impact on human disease.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)90-100
    Number of pages11
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Genetics and Development
    Volume37
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Genetics
    • Developmental Biology

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