How residential mobility and school choice challenge assumptions of neighborhood place-based interventions

Diana Silver, Beth C. Weitzman, Tod Mijanovich, Martha Holleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Explore the importance of residential mobility and use of services outside neighborhoods when interventions targeting low-income families are planned and implemented. Design: Analysis of cross-sectional telephone household survey data on childhood mobility and school enrollment in four large distressed cities. Setting: Baltimore, Maryland; Detroit, Michigan; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Richmond, Virginia. Subjects: Total of 1723 teens aged 10 to 18 years and their parents. Measures: Continuous self-report of the number of years parents lived in the neighborhood of residence and city; self-report of whether the child attends school in their neighborhood; and categorical self report of parents' marital status, mother's education, parent race, family income, child's age, and child's sex. Analysis: Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression. Results: In this sample, 85.2% of teens reported living in the city where they were born. However, only 44.4% of black teens lived in neighborhoods where they were born, compared with 59.2% of white teens. Although 50.3% of black teens attended schools outside of their current neighborhoods, only 31.4% of whites did. Residential mobility was more common among black than white children (odds ratio = 1.82; p <.001), and black teens had 43% lesser odds of attending school in their home communities. Conclusions: Mobility among low-income and minority families challenges some assumptions of neighborhood interventions premised on years of exposure to enriched services and changes in the built environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-183
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

school choice
Population Dynamics
parents
Self Report
Parents
low income
school
school enrollment
parent education
family income
Baltimore
household survey
large city
marital status
Marital Status
telephone
Telephone
logistics
childhood
minority

Keywords

  • Comprehensive community initiatives
  • Mobility
  • Prevention research
  • School choice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

How residential mobility and school choice challenge assumptions of neighborhood place-based interventions. / Silver, Diana; Weitzman, Beth C.; Mijanovich, Tod; Holleman, Martha.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.2012, p. 180-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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