How many pixels to watermark?

R. Chandramouli, N. Memon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Watermark design and detection have been studied as two separate problems so far. However, we show that, if the watermarking algorithm is based on the watermark detection method, then significant gains can be achieved. With a watermark detector based on a sequential hypothesis test rather than a fixed sample size test, the number of watermark pixels can be reduced almost by a factor of two for small detection error probabilities. This is because, the sequential hypothesis test requires less (average) number of pixels to detect the presence/absence of a watermark compared to a fixed sample size detector. The savings in the number of pixels to be watermarked results in an increased immunity to host signal attacks such as cropping. Degradation in the signal quality due to redundant watermarking is also minimized. Further, applications such as DVD require minimal amount of watermarking. The computational efficiency of the proposed watermark detector can also be exploited to efficiently search for watermarks in large image databases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages11-15
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)0769505406, 9780769505404
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Event1st International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000 - Las Vegas, United States
Duration: Mar 27 2000Mar 29 2000

Other

Other1st International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas
Period3/27/003/29/00

Fingerprint

Watermarking
Pixels
Detectors
Videodisks
Error detection
Computational efficiency
Degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Chandramouli, R., & Memon, N. (2000). How many pixels to watermark? In Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000 (pp. 11-15). [844176] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITCC.2000.844176

How many pixels to watermark? / Chandramouli, R.; Memon, N.

Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2000. p. 11-15 844176.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chandramouli, R & Memon, N 2000, How many pixels to watermark? in Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000., 844176, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 11-15, 1st International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000, Las Vegas, United States, 3/27/00. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITCC.2000.844176
Chandramouli R, Memon N. How many pixels to watermark? In Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2000. p. 11-15. 844176 https://doi.org/10.1109/ITCC.2000.844176
Chandramouli, R. ; Memon, N. / How many pixels to watermark?. Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: Coding and Computing, ITCC 2000. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2000. pp. 11-15
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