How low income neighborhoods change: Entry, exit, and enhancement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines whether the economic gains experienced by low-income neighborhoods in the 1990s followed patterns of classic gentrification (as frequently assumed) - that is, through the in migration of higher income white, households, and out migration (or displacement) of the original lower income, usually minority residents, spurring racial transition in the process. Using the internal Census version of the American Housing Survey, we find no evidence of heightened displacement, even among the most vulnerable, original residents. While the entrance of higher income homeowners was an important source of income gains, so too was the selective exit of lower income homeowners. Original residents also experienced differential gains in income and reported greater increases in their satisfaction with their neighborhood than found in other low-income neighborhoods. Finally, gaining neighborhoods were able to avoid the losses of white households that non-gaining low income tracts experienced, and were thereby more racially stable rather than less.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-97
Number of pages9
JournalRegional Science and Urban Economics
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

low income
income
homeowner
resident
out-migration
gentrification
census
housing
Entry and exit
Enhancement
Low income
Neighborhood change
minority
migration
Income
evidence
economics
Residents
Household

Keywords

  • Displacement
  • Gentrification
  • Neighborhood change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

@article{65010f153efd47e4afb639b33f06d31a,
title = "How low income neighborhoods change: Entry, exit, and enhancement",
abstract = "This paper examines whether the economic gains experienced by low-income neighborhoods in the 1990s followed patterns of classic gentrification (as frequently assumed) - that is, through the in migration of higher income white, households, and out migration (or displacement) of the original lower income, usually minority residents, spurring racial transition in the process. Using the internal Census version of the American Housing Survey, we find no evidence of heightened displacement, even among the most vulnerable, original residents. While the entrance of higher income homeowners was an important source of income gains, so too was the selective exit of lower income homeowners. Original residents also experienced differential gains in income and reported greater increases in their satisfaction with their neighborhood than found in other low-income neighborhoods. Finally, gaining neighborhoods were able to avoid the losses of white households that non-gaining low income tracts experienced, and were thereby more racially stable rather than less.",
keywords = "Displacement, Gentrification, Neighborhood change",
author = "Ellen, {Ingrid Gould} and O'Regan, {Katherine M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2010.12.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "89--97",
journal = "Regional Science and Urban Economics",
issn = "0166-0462",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How low income neighborhoods change

T2 - Entry, exit, and enhancement

AU - Ellen, Ingrid Gould

AU - O'Regan, Katherine M.

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - This paper examines whether the economic gains experienced by low-income neighborhoods in the 1990s followed patterns of classic gentrification (as frequently assumed) - that is, through the in migration of higher income white, households, and out migration (or displacement) of the original lower income, usually minority residents, spurring racial transition in the process. Using the internal Census version of the American Housing Survey, we find no evidence of heightened displacement, even among the most vulnerable, original residents. While the entrance of higher income homeowners was an important source of income gains, so too was the selective exit of lower income homeowners. Original residents also experienced differential gains in income and reported greater increases in their satisfaction with their neighborhood than found in other low-income neighborhoods. Finally, gaining neighborhoods were able to avoid the losses of white households that non-gaining low income tracts experienced, and were thereby more racially stable rather than less.

AB - This paper examines whether the economic gains experienced by low-income neighborhoods in the 1990s followed patterns of classic gentrification (as frequently assumed) - that is, through the in migration of higher income white, households, and out migration (or displacement) of the original lower income, usually minority residents, spurring racial transition in the process. Using the internal Census version of the American Housing Survey, we find no evidence of heightened displacement, even among the most vulnerable, original residents. While the entrance of higher income homeowners was an important source of income gains, so too was the selective exit of lower income homeowners. Original residents also experienced differential gains in income and reported greater increases in their satisfaction with their neighborhood than found in other low-income neighborhoods. Finally, gaining neighborhoods were able to avoid the losses of white households that non-gaining low income tracts experienced, and were thereby more racially stable rather than less.

KW - Displacement

KW - Gentrification

KW - Neighborhood change

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79651471073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79651471073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2010.12.005

DO - 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2010.12.005

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 89

EP - 97

JO - Regional Science and Urban Economics

JF - Regional Science and Urban Economics

SN - 0166-0462

IS - 2

ER -