How "god becomes a lover": Sufi poetry and the finitude of desire in Kurdistan

Joseph Bush

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, this article tracks the imbrication of ordinary and mystical desire in the life of a Muslim man who disavows pietistic forms of ethical striving. It examines the way tropes of desire from Sufi poetry affect everyday life and desire in ordinary relationships with friends and kin. Revising the notion of the "infinity of desire, " which explains the traction of the paradigmatically mystical figures of lover and beloved in pious frameworks, the article argues that the finitude of desire in relation to intimate others in everyday life provides one context in which these figures, and Sufi poetry more generally, may become attractive to contemporary Muslims.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-87
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Middle East Women's Studies
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Kurdistan
poetry
everyday life
god
Muslim
Iraq
Lovers
Finitude
Sufi
Deity
Poetry

Keywords

  • Desire
  • Kurdistan
  • Sufi poetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

How "god becomes a lover" : Sufi poetry and the finitude of desire in Kurdistan. / Bush, Joseph.

In: Journal of Middle East Women's Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 68-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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