How do doctors behave when some (but not all) of their patients are in managed care?

Sharon Glied, Joshua Graff Zivin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most physicians today treat a variety of patients within their practices where a variety of insurance arrangements co-exist. In this paper, we propose several theoretical explanations for physician treatment patterns when the patient population is heterogeneous at the practice level. Data from the 1993-1996 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) are used to test how practice level managed care penetration affects treatment intensity. Practice composition has strong effects on treatment. Visit duration appears to be constant across patients within a practice, while medications prescribed appear to be converging as managed care penetration increases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-353
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Managed Care Programs
Health Care Surveys
Physicians
Insurance
Therapeutics
Population
Managed care
Doctors
Penetration

Keywords

  • Capitation payments
  • Heterogeneous practice
  • Physician treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

How do doctors behave when some (but not all) of their patients are in managed care? / Glied, Sharon; Zivin, Joshua Graff.

In: Journal of Health Economics, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2002, p. 337-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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