How Computer Systems Embody Values

Helen Nissenbaum

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

The story of how information technology has radically altered our lives and even ourselves has been told many times, in many versions. The radical effects of the process have extended to institutions, social processes, relationships, power structures, work, play, education, and beyond. Although the changes have been varied, affecting the economy, the shape and functioning of organizations, artistic expression, and even conceptions of identity, some of us have focused on changes with an ethical dimension. I’ve found it useful to organize this work into two categories according to the distinct ways values factor into it. In one category I place work in which values themselves are not the controversy’s central subject. In the other, however, technology’s values form part of the controversy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages119-120
Number of pages2
Volume34
No3
Specialist publicationComputer
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Computer systems
Information technology
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

How Computer Systems Embody Values. / Nissenbaum, Helen.

In: Computer, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2001, p. 119-120.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Nissenbaum, H 2001, 'How Computer Systems Embody Values' Computer, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 119-120. https://doi.org/10.1109/2.910905
Nissenbaum, Helen. / How Computer Systems Embody Values. In: Computer. 2001 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 119-120.
@misc{2fbd7b66931e41979e2f86aa8962d77a,
title = "How Computer Systems Embody Values",
abstract = "The story of how information technology has radically altered our lives and even ourselves has been told many times, in many versions. The radical effects of the process have extended to institutions, social processes, relationships, power structures, work, play, education, and beyond. Although the changes have been varied, affecting the economy, the shape and functioning of organizations, artistic expression, and even conceptions of identity, some of us have focused on changes with an ethical dimension. I’ve found it useful to organize this work into two categories according to the distinct ways values factor into it. In one category I place work in which values themselves are not the controversy’s central subject. In the other, however, technology’s values form part of the controversy.",
author = "Helen Nissenbaum",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1109/2.910905",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "119--120",
journal = "ACM SIGPLAN/SIGSOFT Workshop on Program Analysis for Software Tools and Engineering",
issn = "0018-9162",
publisher = "IEEE Computer Society",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - How Computer Systems Embody Values

AU - Nissenbaum, Helen

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The story of how information technology has radically altered our lives and even ourselves has been told many times, in many versions. The radical effects of the process have extended to institutions, social processes, relationships, power structures, work, play, education, and beyond. Although the changes have been varied, affecting the economy, the shape and functioning of organizations, artistic expression, and even conceptions of identity, some of us have focused on changes with an ethical dimension. I’ve found it useful to organize this work into two categories according to the distinct ways values factor into it. In one category I place work in which values themselves are not the controversy’s central subject. In the other, however, technology’s values form part of the controversy.

AB - The story of how information technology has radically altered our lives and even ourselves has been told many times, in many versions. The radical effects of the process have extended to institutions, social processes, relationships, power structures, work, play, education, and beyond. Although the changes have been varied, affecting the economy, the shape and functioning of organizations, artistic expression, and even conceptions of identity, some of us have focused on changes with an ethical dimension. I’ve found it useful to organize this work into two categories according to the distinct ways values factor into it. In one category I place work in which values themselves are not the controversy’s central subject. In the other, however, technology’s values form part of the controversy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008025259&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008025259&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/2.910905

DO - 10.1109/2.910905

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 119

EP - 120

JO - ACM SIGPLAN/SIGSOFT Workshop on Program Analysis for Software Tools and Engineering

JF - ACM SIGPLAN/SIGSOFT Workshop on Program Analysis for Software Tools and Engineering

SN - 0018-9162

ER -