Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis

R. M. Vasconcelos, N. Sanfilippo, B. J. Paster, A. R. Kerr, Yihong Li, L. Ramalho, E. L. Queiroz, B. Smith, S. T. Sonis, P. M. Corby

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most common, painful, and debilitating toxicities of cancer regimen-related treatment, resulting in the formation of ulcers, which are susceptible to increased colonization of microorganisms. Novel discoveries in OM have focused on understanding the host-microbial interactions, because current pathways have shown that major virulence factors from microorganisms have the potential to contribute to the development of OM and may even prolong the existence of already established ulcerations, affecting tissue healing. Additional comprehensive and disciplined clinical investigation is needed to carefully characterize the relationship between the clinical trajectory of OM, the local levels of inflammatory changes (both clinical and molecular), and the ebb and flow of the oral microbiota. Answering such questions will increase our knowledge of the mechanisms engaged by the oral immune system in response to mucositis, facilitating their translation into novel therapeutic approaches. In doing so, directed clinical strategies can be developed that specifically target those times and tissues that are most susceptible to intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-733
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume95
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Stomatitis
Microbiota
Microbial Interactions
Mucositis
Second Primary Neoplasms
Virulence Factors
Ulcer
Immune System
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cancer
  • cancer complications
  • damage-associated molecular pattern
  • oral microbiome
  • pathogen-associated molecular pattern
  • Toll-like receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Vasconcelos, R. M., Sanfilippo, N., Paster, B. J., Kerr, A. R., Li, Y., Ramalho, L., ... Corby, P. M. (2016). Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis. Journal of Dental Research, 95(7), 725-733. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034516641890

Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis. / Vasconcelos, R. M.; Sanfilippo, N.; Paster, B. J.; Kerr, A. R.; Li, Yihong; Ramalho, L.; Queiroz, E. L.; Smith, B.; Sonis, S. T.; Corby, P. M.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 95, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 725-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Vasconcelos, RM, Sanfilippo, N, Paster, BJ, Kerr, AR, Li, Y, Ramalho, L, Queiroz, EL, Smith, B, Sonis, ST & Corby, PM 2016, 'Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis', Journal of Dental Research, vol. 95, no. 7, pp. 725-733. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034516641890
Vasconcelos RM, Sanfilippo N, Paster BJ, Kerr AR, Li Y, Ramalho L et al. Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis. Journal of Dental Research. 2016 Jul 1;95(7):725-733. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034516641890
Vasconcelos, R. M. ; Sanfilippo, N. ; Paster, B. J. ; Kerr, A. R. ; Li, Yihong ; Ramalho, L. ; Queiroz, E. L. ; Smith, B. ; Sonis, S. T. ; Corby, P. M. / Host-Microbiome Cross-talk in Oral Mucositis. In: Journal of Dental Research. 2016 ; Vol. 95, No. 7. pp. 725-733.
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