Home-school literacy experiences of Latino preschoolers

Does continuity predict positive child outcomes?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study explored the literacy practices used by primary caregivers and Head Start teachers of low-income Latino children, examined the extent to which these practices are continuous, and investigated the role of continuity in home-school literacy practices on Latino preschoolers' emergent literacy development. Results showed that continuity in home-school global literacy practices, as well as in the use of high-challenging talk during book sharing interactions, was predictive of children's emergent literacy skills at the end of the Head Start year. By contrast, discontinuity in home-school book sharing styles led to higher emergent literacy outcomes. Results are discussed in relation to the importance of the home and preschool environments in supporting low-income Latino children's early literacy development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-380
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hispanic Americans
Literacy
Caregivers

Keywords

  • Book sharing interactions
  • Emergent literacy
  • Head start
  • Home-school continuity
  • Latino preschoolers
  • Literacy practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Home-school literacy experiences of Latino preschoolers: Does continuity predict positive child outcomes?",
abstract = "The current study explored the literacy practices used by primary caregivers and Head Start teachers of low-income Latino children, examined the extent to which these practices are continuous, and investigated the role of continuity in home-school literacy practices on Latino preschoolers' emergent literacy development. Results showed that continuity in home-school global literacy practices, as well as in the use of high-challenging talk during book sharing interactions, was predictive of children's emergent literacy skills at the end of the Head Start year. By contrast, discontinuity in home-school book sharing styles led to higher emergent literacy outcomes. Results are discussed in relation to the importance of the home and preschool environments in supporting low-income Latino children's early literacy development.",
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