Home health care nurses as a new channel for smoking cessation treatment

Outcomes from project CARES (Community-nurse Assisted Research and Education on Smoking)

Belinda Borrelli, Scott Novak, Jacki Hecht, Karen Emmons, George Papandonatos, David Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Clinical guidelines for smoking cessation may not be sufficient for helping some subgroups of smokers quit. Incorporating smoking cessation into home-based medical care can proactively reach high-risk smokers who may not have access to (or spontaneously seek) smoking cessation. Method. Home health care nurses (N = 98) were randomly assigned to deliver either Motivational Enhancement (ME; Motivational Interviewing + Carbon Monoxide Feedback) or Standard Care (AHCPR Guidelines for smoking cessation) to their patients. Seventy percent of patients were eligible and willing to participate (N = 273; 54% female, mean age = 57 years, 83% Caucasian, 41% < high school education). The study was conducted in Providence, RI, USA from 1998 to 2003. Results. Biochemically verified continuous abstinence rates at the 12-month follow-up were 4.2% (SC) and 8.7% (ME) for intent to treat analyses, and 5.2% (SC) and 11.8% (ME) using all available cases (P > 0.05). ME reported more quit attempts and significantly greater reductions in the number of cigarettes smoked per day at all follow-ups through 12 months of post-treatment (all P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Use of an existing public health channel such as home health care to reach smokers who vary in their motivation to quit could have the potential for large public health impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-821
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume41
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

Community Health Nurses
Withholding Treatment
Smoking Cessation
Home Care Services
Smoking
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Research
Public Health
Guidelines
Motivational Interviewing
Patient-Centered Care
Carbon Monoxide
Tobacco Products
Motivation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • AHCPR guidelines
  • AHRQ guidelines
  • Medically ill smokers
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Nurses
  • Older smokers
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Home health care nurses as a new channel for smoking cessation treatment : Outcomes from project CARES (Community-nurse Assisted Research and Education on Smoking). / Borrelli, Belinda; Novak, Scott; Hecht, Jacki; Emmons, Karen; Papandonatos, George; Abrams, David.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 5-6, 11.2005, p. 815-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borrelli, Belinda ; Novak, Scott ; Hecht, Jacki ; Emmons, Karen ; Papandonatos, George ; Abrams, David. / Home health care nurses as a new channel for smoking cessation treatment : Outcomes from project CARES (Community-nurse Assisted Research and Education on Smoking). In: Preventive Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 41, No. 5-6. pp. 815-821.
@article{80d3a6657e184d87a68cad183351ab2d,
title = "Home health care nurses as a new channel for smoking cessation treatment: Outcomes from project CARES (Community-nurse Assisted Research and Education on Smoking)",
abstract = "Background. Clinical guidelines for smoking cessation may not be sufficient for helping some subgroups of smokers quit. Incorporating smoking cessation into home-based medical care can proactively reach high-risk smokers who may not have access to (or spontaneously seek) smoking cessation. Method. Home health care nurses (N = 98) were randomly assigned to deliver either Motivational Enhancement (ME; Motivational Interviewing + Carbon Monoxide Feedback) or Standard Care (AHCPR Guidelines for smoking cessation) to their patients. Seventy percent of patients were eligible and willing to participate (N = 273; 54{\%} female, mean age = 57 years, 83{\%} Caucasian, 41{\%} < high school education). The study was conducted in Providence, RI, USA from 1998 to 2003. Results. Biochemically verified continuous abstinence rates at the 12-month follow-up were 4.2{\%} (SC) and 8.7{\%} (ME) for intent to treat analyses, and 5.2{\%} (SC) and 11.8{\%} (ME) using all available cases (P > 0.05). ME reported more quit attempts and significantly greater reductions in the number of cigarettes smoked per day at all follow-ups through 12 months of post-treatment (all P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Use of an existing public health channel such as home health care to reach smokers who vary in their motivation to quit could have the potential for large public health impact.",
keywords = "AHCPR guidelines, AHRQ guidelines, Medically ill smokers, Motivational interviewing, Nurses, Older smokers, Smoking cessation",
author = "Belinda Borrelli and Scott Novak and Jacki Hecht and Karen Emmons and George Papandonatos and David Abrams",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.08.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "815--821",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5-6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Home health care nurses as a new channel for smoking cessation treatment

T2 - Outcomes from project CARES (Community-nurse Assisted Research and Education on Smoking)

AU - Borrelli, Belinda

AU - Novak, Scott

AU - Hecht, Jacki

AU - Emmons, Karen

AU - Papandonatos, George

AU - Abrams, David

PY - 2005/11

Y1 - 2005/11

N2 - Background. Clinical guidelines for smoking cessation may not be sufficient for helping some subgroups of smokers quit. Incorporating smoking cessation into home-based medical care can proactively reach high-risk smokers who may not have access to (or spontaneously seek) smoking cessation. Method. Home health care nurses (N = 98) were randomly assigned to deliver either Motivational Enhancement (ME; Motivational Interviewing + Carbon Monoxide Feedback) or Standard Care (AHCPR Guidelines for smoking cessation) to their patients. Seventy percent of patients were eligible and willing to participate (N = 273; 54% female, mean age = 57 years, 83% Caucasian, 41% < high school education). The study was conducted in Providence, RI, USA from 1998 to 2003. Results. Biochemically verified continuous abstinence rates at the 12-month follow-up were 4.2% (SC) and 8.7% (ME) for intent to treat analyses, and 5.2% (SC) and 11.8% (ME) using all available cases (P > 0.05). ME reported more quit attempts and significantly greater reductions in the number of cigarettes smoked per day at all follow-ups through 12 months of post-treatment (all P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Use of an existing public health channel such as home health care to reach smokers who vary in their motivation to quit could have the potential for large public health impact.

AB - Background. Clinical guidelines for smoking cessation may not be sufficient for helping some subgroups of smokers quit. Incorporating smoking cessation into home-based medical care can proactively reach high-risk smokers who may not have access to (or spontaneously seek) smoking cessation. Method. Home health care nurses (N = 98) were randomly assigned to deliver either Motivational Enhancement (ME; Motivational Interviewing + Carbon Monoxide Feedback) or Standard Care (AHCPR Guidelines for smoking cessation) to their patients. Seventy percent of patients were eligible and willing to participate (N = 273; 54% female, mean age = 57 years, 83% Caucasian, 41% < high school education). The study was conducted in Providence, RI, USA from 1998 to 2003. Results. Biochemically verified continuous abstinence rates at the 12-month follow-up were 4.2% (SC) and 8.7% (ME) for intent to treat analyses, and 5.2% (SC) and 11.8% (ME) using all available cases (P > 0.05). ME reported more quit attempts and significantly greater reductions in the number of cigarettes smoked per day at all follow-ups through 12 months of post-treatment (all P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Use of an existing public health channel such as home health care to reach smokers who vary in their motivation to quit could have the potential for large public health impact.

KW - AHCPR guidelines

KW - AHRQ guidelines

KW - Medically ill smokers

KW - Motivational interviewing

KW - Nurses

KW - Older smokers

KW - Smoking cessation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28844437746&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28844437746&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.08.004

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 815

EP - 821

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 5-6

ER -