HIV/STD-protective benefits of living with mothers in perceived supportive families: A study of high-risk African American female teens

Richard A. Crosby, Ralph DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph J. DiClemente, Ralph J. DiClemente, Ralph J. DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Brenda K. Cobb, K. Harrington, Susan L. Davies, Edward W. Hook, M. Kim Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The joint influence of living with the mother in a perceived supportive family may be an important HIV/STD-protective factor among sexually active female adolescents. Methods. Sexually active African American female adolescents (N = 522) completed a self-administered survey and structured interview. Adolescents scoring high on family support and reporting that their mother lived with them were compared with the remaining adolescents in respect to unprotected vaginal sex (past 30 days), sex with a non-steady partner (past 6 months), communication with sex partners, attitudes toward condoms, and perceived ability to negotiate condom use. Logistic regression analyses controlled for the influence of parent-adolescent communication about sex and parental monitoring. Results. Adolescents residing with their mothers in a perceived supportive family were more likely to communicate with their sex partners about sexual risk (OR = 1.53). They were less likely to report sex with a non-steady partner (OR = 0.51) or having unprotected sex with a steady partner (OR = 0.52) or any partner (OR = O.55). Conclusions. Controlled analyses suggest that living with the mother in a perceived supportive family is an important HIV/STD-protective factor among female adolescents. HIV/STD prevention programs for female adolescents that include the mothers may promote positive and lasting effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-178
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
African Americans
Mothers
HIV
Unsafe Sex
Condoms
Communication
Aptitude
Sexual Partners
Joints
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African American
  • Family
  • HIV
  • Mothers
  • Sexual behaviors
  • STD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

HIV/STD-protective benefits of living with mothers in perceived supportive families : A study of high-risk African American female teens. / Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.; Cobb, Brenda K.; Harrington, K.; Davies, Susan L.; Hook, Edward W.; Oh, M. Kim.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 175-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crosby, RA, DiClemente, R, Wingood, GM, DiClemente, RJ, DiClemente, RJ, DiClemente, RJ, Wingood, GM, Cobb, BK, Harrington, K, Davies, SL, Hook, EW & Oh, MK 2001, 'HIV/STD-protective benefits of living with mothers in perceived supportive families: A study of high-risk African American female teens', Preventive Medicine, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 175-178. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.2001.0868
Crosby, Richard A. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wingood, Gina M. ; DiClemente, Ralph J. ; DiClemente, Ralph J. ; DiClemente, Ralph J. ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Cobb, Brenda K. ; Harrington, K. ; Davies, Susan L. ; Hook, Edward W. ; Oh, M. Kim. / HIV/STD-protective benefits of living with mothers in perceived supportive families : A study of high-risk African American female teens. In: Preventive Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 175-178.
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AB - Background. The joint influence of living with the mother in a perceived supportive family may be an important HIV/STD-protective factor among sexually active female adolescents. Methods. Sexually active African American female adolescents (N = 522) completed a self-administered survey and structured interview. Adolescents scoring high on family support and reporting that their mother lived with them were compared with the remaining adolescents in respect to unprotected vaginal sex (past 30 days), sex with a non-steady partner (past 6 months), communication with sex partners, attitudes toward condoms, and perceived ability to negotiate condom use. Logistic regression analyses controlled for the influence of parent-adolescent communication about sex and parental monitoring. Results. Adolescents residing with their mothers in a perceived supportive family were more likely to communicate with their sex partners about sexual risk (OR = 1.53). They were less likely to report sex with a non-steady partner (OR = 0.51) or having unprotected sex with a steady partner (OR = 0.52) or any partner (OR = O.55). Conclusions. Controlled analyses suggest that living with the mother in a perceived supportive family is an important HIV/STD-protective factor among female adolescents. HIV/STD prevention programs for female adolescents that include the mothers may promote positive and lasting effects.

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