HIV/AIDS education and prevention among African-Americans: A focus on culture

C. O. Airhihenbuwa, Ralph DiClemente, G. M. Wingood, A. Lowe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

African-Americans have emerged as the 'second wave' of the AIDS epidemic. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that African-Americans adults as well as adolescents have a disproportionately higher risk of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. While programs designed to increase self-protective behaviors are urgently needed to avert a further increase in HIV infection among this population, there is little understanding of African-American sociocultural factors that may influence the acceptance of HIV information and the adoption of HIV-preventive behaviors. This paper describes African-American cultural values and mores which may be related to risk-taking behavior. Barriers to the effective dissemination of HIV prevention education are identified and strategies that may be effective in surmounting these barriers and implementing culturally-appropriate HIV behavioral modification programs are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-276
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
Education
education
Virus Diseases
sociocultural factors
acceptance
Risk-Taking
adolescent
American
evidence
Values
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

HIV/AIDS education and prevention among African-Americans : A focus on culture. / Airhihenbuwa, C. O.; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, G. M.; Lowe, A.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 267-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Airhihenbuwa, C. O. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wingood, G. M. ; Lowe, A. / HIV/AIDS education and prevention among African-Americans : A focus on culture. In: AIDS Education and Prevention. 1992 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 267-276.
@article{c81c11e1ccfe4185948e2263d964c48d,
title = "HIV/AIDS education and prevention among African-Americans: A focus on culture",
abstract = "African-Americans have emerged as the 'second wave' of the AIDS epidemic. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that African-Americans adults as well as adolescents have a disproportionately higher risk of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. While programs designed to increase self-protective behaviors are urgently needed to avert a further increase in HIV infection among this population, there is little understanding of African-American sociocultural factors that may influence the acceptance of HIV information and the adoption of HIV-preventive behaviors. This paper describes African-American cultural values and mores which may be related to risk-taking behavior. Barriers to the effective dissemination of HIV prevention education are identified and strategies that may be effective in surmounting these barriers and implementing culturally-appropriate HIV behavioral modification programs are described.",
author = "Airhihenbuwa, {C. O.} and Ralph DiClemente and Wingood, {G. M.} and A. Lowe",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "267--276",
journal = "AIDS Education and Prevention",
issn = "0899-9546",
publisher = "Guilford Publications",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - HIV/AIDS education and prevention among African-Americans

T2 - A focus on culture

AU - Airhihenbuwa, C. O.

AU - DiClemente, Ralph

AU - Wingood, G. M.

AU - Lowe, A.

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - African-Americans have emerged as the 'second wave' of the AIDS epidemic. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that African-Americans adults as well as adolescents have a disproportionately higher risk of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. While programs designed to increase self-protective behaviors are urgently needed to avert a further increase in HIV infection among this population, there is little understanding of African-American sociocultural factors that may influence the acceptance of HIV information and the adoption of HIV-preventive behaviors. This paper describes African-American cultural values and mores which may be related to risk-taking behavior. Barriers to the effective dissemination of HIV prevention education are identified and strategies that may be effective in surmounting these barriers and implementing culturally-appropriate HIV behavioral modification programs are described.

AB - African-Americans have emerged as the 'second wave' of the AIDS epidemic. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that African-Americans adults as well as adolescents have a disproportionately higher risk of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. While programs designed to increase self-protective behaviors are urgently needed to avert a further increase in HIV infection among this population, there is little understanding of African-American sociocultural factors that may influence the acceptance of HIV information and the adoption of HIV-preventive behaviors. This paper describes African-American cultural values and mores which may be related to risk-taking behavior. Barriers to the effective dissemination of HIV prevention education are identified and strategies that may be effective in surmounting these barriers and implementing culturally-appropriate HIV behavioral modification programs are described.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026658698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026658698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 1389885

AN - SCOPUS:0026658698

VL - 4

SP - 267

EP - 276

JO - AIDS Education and Prevention

JF - AIDS Education and Prevention

SN - 0899-9546

IS - 3

ER -