HIV, Hepatitis C, and Abstinence from Alcohol Among Injection and Non-injection Drug Users

Jennifer C. Elliott, Deborah S. Hasin, Malka Stohl, Don Des Jarlais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Individuals using illicit drugs are at risk for heavy drinking and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite medical consequences of drinking with HIV and/or HCV, whether drug users with these infections are less likely to drink is unclear. Using samples of drug users in treatment with lifetime injection use (n = 1309) and non-injection use (n = 1996) participating in a large, serial, cross-sectional study, we investigated the associations between HIV and HCV with abstinence from alcohol. About half of injection drug users (52.8 %) and 26.6 % of non-injection drug users abstained from alcohol. Among non-injection drug users, those with HIV were less likely to abstain [odds ratio (OR) 0.55; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.58] while those with HCV were more likely to abstain (OR 1.46; AOR 1.34). In contrast, among injection drug users, neither HIV nor HCV was associated with drinking. However, exploratory analyses suggested that younger injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to drink, whereas older injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to abstain. In summary, individuals using drugs, especially non-injection users and those with HIV, are likely to drink. Age may modify the risk of drinking among injection drug users with HIV and HCV, a finding requiring replication. Alcohol intervention for HIV and HCV infected drug users is needed to prevent further harm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-554
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Alcohol Abstinence
Hepatitis C
Drug Users
Hepacivirus
HIV
Injections
Drinking
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Street Drugs
Infection
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Drug use
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

HIV, Hepatitis C, and Abstinence from Alcohol Among Injection and Non-injection Drug Users. / Elliott, Jennifer C.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Stohl, Malka; Des Jarlais, Don.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 548-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elliott, Jennifer C. ; Hasin, Deborah S. ; Stohl, Malka ; Des Jarlais, Don. / HIV, Hepatitis C, and Abstinence from Alcohol Among Injection and Non-injection Drug Users. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 548-554.
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