HIV care providers' implementation of routine alcohol reduction support for their patients

Shiela M. Strauss, Nelson J. Tiburcio, Corrine Munoz-Plaza, Marya Gwadz, Joseph Lunievicz, Andrew Osborne, Diana Padilla, Mary McCarty Arias, Robert Norman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Screening and brief intervention (SBI) for alcohol reduction is an important health promoting strategy for patients with HIV, and HIV care providers are optimally situated to support their patients' reduction efforts. We report results from analyses that use data collected from providers (n=115) in 7 hospital-based HIV care centers in the New York City metropolitan area in 2007 concerning their routine use of 11 alcohol SBI components with their patients. Providers routinely implemented 5 or more of these alcohol SBI components if they (1) had a specific caseload (and were therefore responsible for a smaller number of patients), (2) had greater exposure to information about alcohol's effect on HIV, (3) had been in their present positions for at least 1 year, and (4) had greater self efficacy to support patients' alcohol reduction efforts. Findings suggest the importance of educating all HIV care providers about both the negative impact of excessive alcohol use on patients with HIV and the importance and value of alcohol SBIs. Findings also suggest the value of promoting increased self efficacy for at least some providers in implementing alcohol SBI components, especially through targeted alcohol SBI training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-218
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

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Alcohols
HIV
Self Efficacy
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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Strauss, S. M., Tiburcio, N. J., Munoz-Plaza, C., Gwadz, M., Lunievicz, J., Osborne, A., ... Norman, R. (2009). HIV care providers' implementation of routine alcohol reduction support for their patients. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 23(3), 211-218. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2008.0008

HIV care providers' implementation of routine alcohol reduction support for their patients. / Strauss, Shiela M.; Tiburcio, Nelson J.; Munoz-Plaza, Corrine; Gwadz, Marya; Lunievicz, Joseph; Osborne, Andrew; Padilla, Diana; Arias, Mary McCarty; Norman, Robert.

In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 211-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strauss, SM, Tiburcio, NJ, Munoz-Plaza, C, Gwadz, M, Lunievicz, J, Osborne, A, Padilla, D, Arias, MM & Norman, R 2009, 'HIV care providers' implementation of routine alcohol reduction support for their patients', AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 211-218. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2008.0008
Strauss, Shiela M. ; Tiburcio, Nelson J. ; Munoz-Plaza, Corrine ; Gwadz, Marya ; Lunievicz, Joseph ; Osborne, Andrew ; Padilla, Diana ; Arias, Mary McCarty ; Norman, Robert. / HIV care providers' implementation of routine alcohol reduction support for their patients. In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs. 2009 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 211-218.
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