HIV-1 transmission in injection paraphernalia: Heating drug solutions may inactivate HIV-1

Michael C. Clatts, Robert Heimer, Nadia Abdala, Lloyd Goldsamt, Jo L. Sotheran, Kenneth T. Anderson, Toni M. Gallo, Lee D. Hoffer, Pellegrino A. Luciano, Tassos Kyriakides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In response to recent concerns about risk of HIV-1 transmission from drug injection paraphernalia such as cookers, ethnographic methods were used to develop a descriptive typology of the paraphernalia and practices used to prepare and inject illegal drugs. Observational data were then applied in laboratory studies in which a quantitative HIV-1 microculture assay was used to measure the recovery of infectious HIV-1 in cookers. HIV-1 survival inside cookers was a function of the temperature achieved during preparation of drug solutions; HIV-1 was inactivated once temperature exceeded, on average, 65°C. Although different types of cookers, volumes, and heat sources affected survival times, heating cookers 15 seconds or longer reduced viable HIV-1 below detectable levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-199
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999

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Heating
HIV-1
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Compounding
Temperature
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Drug injection practices
  • Ethnography
  • HIV-1 transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Clatts, M. C., Heimer, R., Abdala, N., Goldsamt, L., Sotheran, J. L., Anderson, K. T., ... Kyriakides, T. (1999). HIV-1 transmission in injection paraphernalia: Heating drug solutions may inactivate HIV-1. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology, 22(2), 194-199.

HIV-1 transmission in injection paraphernalia : Heating drug solutions may inactivate HIV-1. / Clatts, Michael C.; Heimer, Robert; Abdala, Nadia; Goldsamt, Lloyd; Sotheran, Jo L.; Anderson, Kenneth T.; Gallo, Toni M.; Hoffer, Lee D.; Luciano, Pellegrino A.; Kyriakides, Tassos.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.10.1999, p. 194-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clatts, MC, Heimer, R, Abdala, N, Goldsamt, L, Sotheran, JL, Anderson, KT, Gallo, TM, Hoffer, LD, Luciano, PA & Kyriakides, T 1999, 'HIV-1 transmission in injection paraphernalia: Heating drug solutions may inactivate HIV-1', Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 194-199.
Clatts, Michael C. ; Heimer, Robert ; Abdala, Nadia ; Goldsamt, Lloyd ; Sotheran, Jo L. ; Anderson, Kenneth T. ; Gallo, Toni M. ; Hoffer, Lee D. ; Luciano, Pellegrino A. ; Kyriakides, Tassos. / HIV-1 transmission in injection paraphernalia : Heating drug solutions may inactivate HIV-1. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology. 1999 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 194-199.
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