High-Reynolds-number turbulence in small apparatus: Grid turbulence in cryogenic liquids

Christopher M. White, Adonios N. Karpetis, Katepalli R. Sreenivasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Liquid helium at 4.2 K has a viscosity that is about 40 times smaller than that of water at room temperature, and about 600 times smaller than that of air at atmospheric pressure. It is therefore a convenient fluid for generating in a table-top apparatus turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers that require large air and water facilities. Here, we produce turbulence behind towed grids in a liquid helium chamber that is 5 cm2 in cross-section at mesh Reynolds numbers of up to 7 × 105. Liquid nitrogen is intermediate in its viscosity as well as refrigeration demands, and so we also exploit its use to generate towed-grid turbulence up to mesh Reynolds number of about 2 × 104. In both instances, we map two-dimensional fields of velocity vectors using particle image velocimetry, and compare the data with those in water and air.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-197
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Fluid Mechanics
Volume452
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2002

Fingerprint

Cryogenic liquids
high Reynolds number
cryogenics
Reynolds number
Turbulence
turbulence
grids
liquid helium
Helium
mesh
air
liquids
Air
Viscosity
viscosity
water
Water
Liquids
Liquid nitrogen
particle image velocimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

High-Reynolds-number turbulence in small apparatus : Grid turbulence in cryogenic liquids. / White, Christopher M.; Karpetis, Adonios N.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 452, 10.02.2002, p. 189-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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