Heavy flags undergo spontaneous oscillations in flowing water

Michael Shelley, Nicolas Vandenberghe, Jun Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

By immersing a compliant yet self-supporting sheet into flowing water, we study a heavy, streamlined, and elastic body interacting with a fluid. We find that above a critical flow velocity a sheet aligned with the flow begins to flap with a Strouhal frequency consistent with animal locomotion. This transition is subcritical. Our results agree qualitatively with a simple fluid dynamical model that predicts linear instability at a critical flow speed. Both experiment and theory emphasize the importance of body inertia in overcoming the stabilizing effects of finite rigidity and fluid drag.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number094302
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume94
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 2005

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critical flow
oscillations
streamlined bodies
fluids
water
elastic bodies
locomotion
critical velocity
rigidity
inertia
drag
animals
flow velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Heavy flags undergo spontaneous oscillations in flowing water. / Shelley, Michael; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Zhang, Jun.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 94, No. 9, 094302, 11.03.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shelley, Michael ; Vandenberghe, Nicolas ; Zhang, Jun. / Heavy flags undergo spontaneous oscillations in flowing water. In: Physical Review Letters. 2005 ; Vol. 94, No. 9.
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