Health insurance expansions for working families: A comparison of targeting strategies

Danielle H. Ferry, Bowen Garrett, Sharon Glied, Emily K. Greenman, Len M. Nichols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We compare three eligibility criteria for targeting health insurance expansions in working families: poverty, hourly wages, and employment in a small firm. Making pairwise comparisons among these, we find that targeting by poverty is the most effective and efficient. A poverty-based method is also the most effective way to target those lacking access to employer-sponsored insurance and those with low take-up of such coverage. When we examine the effectiveness of targeting by family type, we find that marital status and number of workers in the family make little difference once we control for the presence of children and for poverty level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-254
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Poverty
Health Insurance
health insurance
poverty
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Marital Status
Insurance
marital status
insurance
wage
employer
coverage
firm
worker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Health insurance expansions for working families : A comparison of targeting strategies. / Ferry, Danielle H.; Garrett, Bowen; Glied, Sharon; Greenman, Emily K.; Nichols, Len M.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2002, p. 246-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferry, Danielle H. ; Garrett, Bowen ; Glied, Sharon ; Greenman, Emily K. ; Nichols, Len M. / Health insurance expansions for working families : A comparison of targeting strategies. In: Health Affairs. 2002 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 246-254.
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