Health education and multimedia learning: connecting theory and practice (Part 2).

Francisco G. Mas, Jan Plass, William M. Kane, Richard L. Papenfuss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Part 1 of this article reviewed the contributions of educational psychology to the early development of health behavior theory and the difficulties faced by health education in adopting some of the perspectives that today guide multimedia learning. Whereas Part 1 involved discussion at the theoretical level, the purpose of Part 2 is to connect theory and practice by describing the most relevant multimedia learning theories and by providing recommendations for developing multimedia health education programs. It also provides practitioners with specific examples of the features that may make computer-based interventions more attractive to their particular audiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)464-469
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2003

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Multimedia
Health Education
Learning
Educational Psychology
Health Behavior

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Health education and multimedia learning : connecting theory and practice (Part 2). / Mas, Francisco G.; Plass, Jan; Kane, William M.; Papenfuss, Richard L.

In: Health Promotion Practice, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2003, p. 464-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mas, Francisco G. ; Plass, Jan ; Kane, William M. ; Papenfuss, Richard L. / Health education and multimedia learning : connecting theory and practice (Part 2). In: Health Promotion Practice. 2003 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 464-469.
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