Health Disparities and Delayed Health care among Older Adults in California: A Perspective from Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

Yan Du, Qingwen Xu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To examine racial/ethnic/immigration disparities in health and to investigate the relationships among race/ethnic/immigration status, delayed health care, and health of the elderly.

    DESIGN AND SAMPLE: Responses from 13,508 people aged 65 and above were analyzed based on the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) 2011-2012.

    MEASURES: Key variables include race/ethnicity/immigration status, health outcome, and delayed health care. Age, gender, education, work status, and annual family income are used as covariates.

    RESULTS: The findings indicate that Whites (regardless of country of birth) and U.S.-born Asians enjoy better health than Latinos, African-Americans, and Foreign-born Asians. Foreign-born Asians and foreign-born Latinos have the poorest self-reported health and mental health, respectively. Delayed use of health care is negatively associated with both self-reported health and mental health status.

    CONCLUSIONS: Health disparities exist among older adult populations; the combined effects of minority and immigrant status can be approximated from the results in this study. Health care accessibility and the quality of care should be promoted in minority/immigrant populations. Public health nurses have a strong potential to aide in reducing health disparities among an aging American population that continues to exhibit increasing racial/ethnic diversity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)383-394
    Number of pages12
    JournalPublic health nursing (Boston, Mass.)
    Volume33
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

    Fingerprint

    Healthcare Disparities
    Emigration and Immigration
    Health
    Delivery of Health Care
    Hispanic Americans
    Health Status
    Mental Health
    Population
    Public Health Nurses
    Quality of Health Care
    Health Surveys
    African Americans
    Parturition
    Interviews
    Education

    Keywords

    • delayed health care
    • health disparity
    • older adults
    • race/ethnicity and immigration

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Nursing(all)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Health Disparities and Delayed Health care among Older Adults in California : A Perspective from Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration. / Du, Yan; Xu, Qingwen.

    In: Public health nursing (Boston, Mass.), Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.09.2016, p. 383-394.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To examine racial/ethnic/immigration disparities in health and to investigate the relationships among race/ethnic/immigration status, delayed health care, and health of the elderly.DESIGN AND SAMPLE: Responses from 13,508 people aged 65 and above were analyzed based on the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) 2011-2012.MEASURES: Key variables include race/ethnicity/immigration status, health outcome, and delayed health care. Age, gender, education, work status, and annual family income are used as covariates.RESULTS: The findings indicate that Whites (regardless of country of birth) and U.S.-born Asians enjoy better health than Latinos, African-Americans, and Foreign-born Asians. Foreign-born Asians and foreign-born Latinos have the poorest self-reported health and mental health, respectively. Delayed use of health care is negatively associated with both self-reported health and mental health status.CONCLUSIONS: Health disparities exist among older adult populations; the combined effects of minority and immigrant status can be approximated from the results in this study. Health care accessibility and the quality of care should be promoted in minority/immigrant populations. Public health nurses have a strong potential to aide in reducing health disparities among an aging American population that continues to exhibit increasing racial/ethnic diversity.",
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