HCI, natural science and design: a framework for triangulation across disciplines

Wendy E. Mackay, Anne-Laure Fayard

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Human-computer interaction is multidisciplinary, drawing paradigms and techniques from both the natural sciences and the design disciplines. HCI cannot be considered a pure natural science because it studies the interaction between people and artifically-created artifacts, rather than naturally-occurring phenomena, which violates several basic assumptions of natural science. Similarly, HCI cannot be considered a pure design discipline because it strives to independently verify design decisions and processes, and borrows many values from scientists. The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple framework that describes how the research and design models underlying HCI can be integrated. We explore the relationships among these approaches in the context of a particular research site, CENA, the Centre d' Etudes de la Navigation Aerienne, and illustrate how the various disciplines can contribute to a complex design problem: improving the interface to the French air traffic control system.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS
    PublisherACM
    Pages223-234
    Number of pages12
    StatePublished - 1997
    EventProceedings of the 1997 2nd Biannual Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS'97 - Amsterdam, Neth
    Duration: Aug 18 1997Aug 20 1997

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the 1997 2nd Biannual Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS'97
    CityAmsterdam, Neth
    Period8/18/978/20/97

    Fingerprint

    Natural sciences
    Triangulation
    Human computer interaction
    Air traffic control
    Navigation
    Control systems

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Control and Systems Engineering

    Cite this

    Mackay, W. E., & Fayard, A-L. (1997). HCI, natural science and design: a framework for triangulation across disciplines. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS (pp. 223-234). ACM.

    HCI, natural science and design : a framework for triangulation across disciplines. / Mackay, Wendy E.; Fayard, Anne-Laure.

    Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. ACM, 1997. p. 223-234.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Mackay, WE & Fayard, A-L 1997, HCI, natural science and design: a framework for triangulation across disciplines. in Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. ACM, pp. 223-234, Proceedings of the 1997 2nd Biannual Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS'97, Amsterdam, Neth, 8/18/97.
    Mackay WE, Fayard A-L. HCI, natural science and design: a framework for triangulation across disciplines. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. ACM. 1997. p. 223-234
    Mackay, Wendy E. ; Fayard, Anne-Laure. / HCI, natural science and design : a framework for triangulation across disciplines. Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. ACM, 1997. pp. 223-234
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