Gustducin and its role in taste

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mechanisms responsible for taste signal transductions are very complex. A key molecule, α-gustducin, a primarily taste-specific G protein α-subunit, was discovered in 1992 and was later found to be involved in both bitter and sweet taste transduction. A proposed mechanism for α-gustducin involves coupling specific cell-surface receptors with a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase which would open a cyclic nucleotide-suppressible cation channel leading to influx of calcium, and ultimately leading to release of neurotransmitter. Although "knock-out" animals deficient in the α-gustducin gene clearly demonstrate that gustducin is an essential molecule for tasting certain bitter and sweet compounds, the precise role of α-gustducin in bitter and sweet taste is presently unclear. Indeed, there are several other signaling mechanisms in sweet and bitter taste, apparently unrelated to α-gustducin, that increase cyclic AMP or inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate. Thus, proposed models for α-gustducin and those found by other laboratories may be parallel and interdependent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-544
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume77
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1998

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Cyclic Nucleotides
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases
Protein Subunits
Cell Surface Receptors
gustducin
GTP-Binding Proteins
Cyclic AMP
Neurotransmitter Agents
Cations
Signal Transduction
Calcium
Genes

Keywords

  • G proteins
  • Gustatory transduction
  • Gustducin
  • Taste

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Gustducin and its role in taste. / Spielman, Andrew.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 77, No. 4, 1998, p. 539-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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