Growing older in world cities: Implications for health and long-term care policy

Victor G. Rodwin, Michael K. Gusmano, Robert N. Butler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Abstract

Declining birth rates, increasing longevity, and urbanization have created a new challenge for cities: how to respond to an aging population. Although population aging and urbanization are not new concerns for national governments around the world, the consequences of these trends for quality of life in cities have received scant attention. No comparative studies of world cities have examined their health or long-term care systems; nor have comparisons of national systems for the provision of long-term care focused on cities, let alone world cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGrowing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo
PublisherVanderbilt University Press
Pages1-16
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)0826514898, 9780826514899
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

urbanization
declining birth rate
health
quality of life
trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Rodwin, V. G., Gusmano, M. K., & Butler, R. N. (2006). Growing older in world cities: Implications for health and long-term care policy. In Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo (pp. 1-16). Vanderbilt University Press.

Growing older in world cities : Implications for health and long-term care policy. / Rodwin, Victor G.; Gusmano, Michael K.; Butler, Robert N.

Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo. Vanderbilt University Press, 2006. p. 1-16.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Rodwin, VG, Gusmano, MK & Butler, RN 2006, Growing older in world cities: Implications for health and long-term care policy. in Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo. Vanderbilt University Press, pp. 1-16.
Rodwin VG, Gusmano MK, Butler RN. Growing older in world cities: Implications for health and long-term care policy. In Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo. Vanderbilt University Press. 2006. p. 1-16
Rodwin, Victor G. ; Gusmano, Michael K. ; Butler, Robert N. / Growing older in world cities : Implications for health and long-term care policy. Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo. Vanderbilt University Press, 2006. pp. 1-16
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