Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation)

Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence, Samantha J. Wojda, Lindsay N. Barlow, Thomas D. Drummer, Alesha Castillo, Oran Kennedy, Keith W. Condon, Janene Auger, Hal L. Black, O. Lynne Nelson, Charles T. Robbins, Seth W. Donahue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1186-1191
Number of pages6
JournalBone
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

Ursidae
Hibernation
Bone and Bones
Bone Resorption
Osteogenesis
Minerals
Ilium
Calcaneus
Bone Remodeling
Cancellous Bone
Femur
Osteoporosis
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Architecture
  • Bear
  • Disuse osteoporosis
  • Remodeling
  • Trabecular bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Histology

Cite this

McGee-Lawrence, M. E., Wojda, S. J., Barlow, L. N., Drummer, T. D., Castillo, A., Kennedy, O., ... Donahue, S. W. (2009). Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Bone, 45(6), 1186-1191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2009.08.011

Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation). / McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Barlow, Lindsay N.; Drummer, Thomas D.; Castillo, Alesha; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W.; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L.; Nelson, O. Lynne; Robbins, Charles T.; Donahue, Seth W.

In: Bone, Vol. 45, No. 6, 12.2009, p. 1186-1191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGee-Lawrence, ME, Wojda, SJ, Barlow, LN, Drummer, TD, Castillo, A, Kennedy, O, Condon, KW, Auger, J, Black, HL, Nelson, OL, Robbins, CT & Donahue, SW 2009, 'Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation)', Bone, vol. 45, no. 6, pp. 1186-1191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2009.08.011
McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E. ; Wojda, Samantha J. ; Barlow, Lindsay N. ; Drummer, Thomas D. ; Castillo, Alesha ; Kennedy, Oran ; Condon, Keith W. ; Auger, Janene ; Black, Hal L. ; Nelson, O. Lynne ; Robbins, Charles T. ; Donahue, Seth W. / Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation). In: Bone. 2009 ; Vol. 45, No. 6. pp. 1186-1191.
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abstract = "Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.",
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