gp340 expressed on human genital epithelia binds HIV-1 envelope protein and facilitates viral transmission

Earl Stoddard, Georgetta Cannon, Houping Ni, Katalin Karikó, John Capodici, Daniel Malamud, Drew Weissman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During sexual transmission of HIV in women, the first cells likely to be infected are submucosal CD4+ T cells and dendritic cells of the lower genital tract. HIV is segregated from these target cells by an epithelial cell layer that can be bypassed even when healthy and intact. To understand how HIV penetrates this barrier, we identified a host protein, gp340, that is expressed on genital epithelium and binds the HIV envelope via a specific protein-protein interaction. This binding allows otherwise subinfectious amounts of HIV to efficiently infect target cells and allows this infection to occur over a longer period of time after binding. Our findings suggest a mechanism of viral entry during heterosexual transmission where HIV is bound to intact genital epithelia, which then promotes the initial events of infection. Understanding this step in the initiation of infection will allow for the development of tools and methods for blocking HIV transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3126-3132
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume179
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Viral Envelope Proteins
HIV-1
Epithelium
HIV
Infection
Proteins
Heterosexuality
Dendritic Cells
Epithelial Cells
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Stoddard, E., Cannon, G., Ni, H., Karikó, K., Capodici, J., Malamud, D., & Weissman, D. (2007). gp340 expressed on human genital epithelia binds HIV-1 envelope protein and facilitates viral transmission. Journal of Immunology, 179(5), 3126-3132.

gp340 expressed on human genital epithelia binds HIV-1 envelope protein and facilitates viral transmission. / Stoddard, Earl; Cannon, Georgetta; Ni, Houping; Karikó, Katalin; Capodici, John; Malamud, Daniel; Weissman, Drew.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 179, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 3126-3132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stoddard, E, Cannon, G, Ni, H, Karikó, K, Capodici, J, Malamud, D & Weissman, D 2007, 'gp340 expressed on human genital epithelia binds HIV-1 envelope protein and facilitates viral transmission', Journal of Immunology, vol. 179, no. 5, pp. 3126-3132.
Stoddard, Earl ; Cannon, Georgetta ; Ni, Houping ; Karikó, Katalin ; Capodici, John ; Malamud, Daniel ; Weissman, Drew. / gp340 expressed on human genital epithelia binds HIV-1 envelope protein and facilitates viral transmission. In: Journal of Immunology. 2007 ; Vol. 179, No. 5. pp. 3126-3132.
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