Gestational weight gain and predicted changes in offspring anthropometrics between early infancy and 3 years

Andrea Deierlein, A. M. Siega-Riz, A. H. Herring, L. S. Adair, J. L. Daniels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine how gestational weight gain (GWG), categorized using the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations, relates to changes in offspring weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ) and weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ) between early infancy and 3 years. Methods: Women with singleton infants were recruited from the third cohort of the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study (2001-2005). Term infants with at least one weight or length measurement during the study period were included (n = 476). Multivariable linear mixed effects regression models estimated longitudinal changes in WAZ, LAZ and WLZ associated with GWG. Results: In early infancy, compared with infants of women with adequate weight gain, those of women with excessive weight gains had higher WAZ, LAZ and WLZ. Excessive GWG ≥ 200% of the recommended amount was associated with faster rates of change in WAZ and LAZ and noticeably higher predicted mean WAZ and WLZ that persisted across the study period. Conclusions: GWG is associated with significant differences in offspring anthropometrics in early infancy that persisted to 3 years of age. More longitudinal studies that utilize maternal and paediatric body composition measures are necessary to understand the nature of this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-142
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric obesity
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Weights and Measures
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Body Weights and Measures
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Body Composition
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Pediatrics
Infection

Keywords

  • Anthropometrics
  • Gestational weight gain
  • Longitudinal
  • Offspring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Gestational weight gain and predicted changes in offspring anthropometrics between early infancy and 3 years. / Deierlein, Andrea; Siega-Riz, A. M.; Herring, A. H.; Adair, L. S.; Daniels, J. L.

In: Pediatric obesity, Vol. 7, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 134-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deierlein, Andrea ; Siega-Riz, A. M. ; Herring, A. H. ; Adair, L. S. ; Daniels, J. L. / Gestational weight gain and predicted changes in offspring anthropometrics between early infancy and 3 years. In: Pediatric obesity. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 134-142.
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