Geospatial clustering in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Boston youth

Kosuke Tamura, Dustin T. Duncan, Jessica K. Athens, Marie A. Bragg, Michael Rienti, Jared Aldstadt, Marc A. Scott, Brian Elbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective was to detect geospatial clustering of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake in Boston adolescents (age = 16.3 ± 1.3 years [range: 13–19]; female = 56.1%; White = 10.4%, Black = 42.6%, Hispanics = 32.4%, and others = 14.6%) using spatial scan statistics. We used data on self-reported SSB intake from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (n = 1292). Two binary variables were created: consumption of SSB (never versus any) on (1) soda and (2) other sugary drinks (e.g., lemonade). A Bernoulli spatial scan statistic was used to identify geospatial clusters of soda and other sugary drinks in unadjusted models and models adjusted for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. There was no statistically significant clustering of soda consumption in the unadjusted model. In contrast, a cluster of non-soda SSB consumption emerged in the middle of Boston (relative risk = 1.20, p = .005), indicating that adolescents within the cluster had a 20% higher probability of reporting non-soda SSB intake than outside the cluster. The cluster was no longer significant in the adjusted model, suggesting spatial variation in non-soda SSB drink intake correlates with the geographic distribution of students by race/ethnicity, age, and gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 9 2017

Fingerprint

Beverages
beverages
Cluster Analysis
sugars
nationalities and ethnic groups
statistics
gender
spatial data
relative risk
Hispanic Americans
spatial variation
geographical distribution
students
Students

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • Geospatial clustering
  • spatial scan statistic
  • sugary drink intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Geospatial clustering in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Boston youth. / Tamura, Kosuke; Duncan, Dustin T.; Athens, Jessica K.; Bragg, Marie A.; Rienti, Michael; Aldstadt, Jared; Scott, Marc A.; Elbel, Brian.

In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 09.01.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The objective was to detect geospatial clustering of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake in Boston adolescents (age = 16.3 ± 1.3 years [range: 13–19]; female = 56.1{\%}; White = 10.4{\%}, Black = 42.6{\%}, Hispanics = 32.4{\%}, and others = 14.6{\%}) using spatial scan statistics. We used data on self-reported SSB intake from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (n = 1292). Two binary variables were created: consumption of SSB (never versus any) on (1) soda and (2) other sugary drinks (e.g., lemonade). A Bernoulli spatial scan statistic was used to identify geospatial clusters of soda and other sugary drinks in unadjusted models and models adjusted for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. There was no statistically significant clustering of soda consumption in the unadjusted model. In contrast, a cluster of non-soda SSB consumption emerged in the middle of Boston (relative risk = 1.20, p = .005), indicating that adolescents within the cluster had a 20{\%} higher probability of reporting non-soda SSB intake than outside the cluster. The cluster was no longer significant in the adjusted model, suggesting spatial variation in non-soda SSB drink intake correlates with the geographic distribution of students by race/ethnicity, age, and gender.",
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