Gentrification and Fair Housing

Does Gentrification Further Integration?

Ingrid Ellen, Gerard Torrats-Espinosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, long-time residents of cities across the country feel increasingly anxious that they will be priced out of their homes and communities, as growing numbers of higher-income, college-educated households opt for downtown neighborhoods. These fears are particularly acute among black and Latino residents. Yet when looking through the lens of fair housing, gentrification also offers a potential opportunity, as the moves that higher-income, white households make into predominantly minority, lower-income neighborhoods are moves that help to integrate those neighborhoods, at least in the near term. We explore the long-term trajectory of predominantly minority, low-income neighborhoods that gentrified over the 1980s and 1990s. On average, these neighborhoods experienced little racial change while they gentrified, but a significant minority became racially integrated during the decade of gentrification, and over the longer term, many of these neighborhoods remained racially stable. That said, some gentrifying neighborhoods that were predominantly minority in 1980 appeared to be on the path to becoming predominantly white. Policies, such as investments in place-based, subsidized housing, are needed in many gentrifying neighborhoods to ensure racial and economic diversity over the longer term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHousing Policy Debate
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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gentrification
housing
minority
income
low income
resident
anniversary
city center
trajectory
act
anxiety

Keywords

  • gentrification
  • integration
  • neighborhoods
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Gentrification and Fair Housing : Does Gentrification Further Integration? / Ellen, Ingrid; Torrats-Espinosa, Gerard.

In: Housing Policy Debate, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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