Genome-wide detection of meiotic DNA double-strand break hotspots using single-stranded DNA.

Hannah G. Blitzblau, Andreas Hochwagen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The controlled fragmentation of chromosomes by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiates meiotic recombination, which is essential for meiotic chromosome segregation in most eukaryotes. This chapter describes a straightforward microarray-based approach to measure the genome-wide distribution of meiotic DSBs by detecting the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that transiently accumulates at DSB sites during recombination. The protocol outlined here has been optimized to detect meiotic DSBs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, because ssDNA is a universal intermediate of homologous recombination, this method can ostensibly be adapted to discover and analyze programmed or damage-induced DSB hotspots in other organisms whose genome sequence is available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-63
Number of pages17
JournalMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume745
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Double-Stranded DNA Breaks
Single-Stranded DNA
Genetic Recombination
Genome
Single-Stranded DNA Breaks
Chromosome Segregation
Homologous Recombination
Eukaryota
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Chromosomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Genome-wide detection of meiotic DNA double-strand break hotspots using single-stranded DNA. / Blitzblau, Hannah G.; Hochwagen, Andreas.

In: Methods in Molecular Biology, Vol. 745, 2011, p. 47-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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