Generation of black-dominant responses in V1 cortex

Dajun Xing, Chun I. Yeh, Robert Shapley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Consistent with human perceptual data, we found many more black-dominant than white-dominant responses in layer 2/3 neurons of the macaque primary visual cortex (V1). Seeking the mechanism of this black dominance of layer 2/3 neurons, we measured the laminar pattern of population responses (multiunit activity and local field potential) and found that a small preference for black is observable in early responses in layer 4Cβ, the parvocellular-input layer, but not in the magnocellular-input layer 4Cα. Surprisingly, further analysis of the dynamics of black-white responses in layers 4Cβ and 2/3 suggested that black-dominant responses in layer 2/3 were not generated simply because of the weak black-dominant inputs from 4Cβ. Instead, our results indicated the neural circuitry in V1 is wired with a preference to strengthen black responses. We hypothesize that this selective wiring could be due to (1) feedforward connectivity from black-dominant neurons in layer 4C to cells in layer 2/3 or (2) recurrent interactions between black-dominant neurons in layer 2/3, or a combination of both.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13504-13512
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume30
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2010

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Neurons
Macaca
Visual Cortex
Population
hydroquinone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Generation of black-dominant responses in V1 cortex. / Xing, Dajun; Yeh, Chun I.; Shapley, Robert.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 30, No. 40, 06.10.2010, p. 13504-13512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xing, Dajun ; Yeh, Chun I. ; Shapley, Robert. / Generation of black-dominant responses in V1 cortex. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 30, No. 40. pp. 13504-13512.
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