Gender Stereotypes in the Workplace: Obstacles to Women's Career Progress

Madeline Heilman, Elizabeth J. Parks-Stamm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the implications of both the descriptive and prescriptive aspects of gender stereotypes for women in the workplace. Using the Lack of Fit model, we review how performance expectations deriving from descriptive gender stereotypes (i.e., what women are like) can impede women's career progress. We then identify organizational conditions that may weaken the influence of these expectations. In addition, we discuss how prescriptive gender stereotypes (i.e., what women should be like) promote sex bias by creating norms that, when not followed, induce disapproval and social penalties for women. We then review recent research exploring the conditions under which women experience penalties for direct, or inferred, prescriptive norm violations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-77
Number of pages31
JournalAdvances in Group Processes
Volume24
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

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stereotype
workplace
career
gender
penalty
norm violation
lack
trend
performance
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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Gender Stereotypes in the Workplace : Obstacles to Women's Career Progress. / Heilman, Madeline; Parks-Stamm, Elizabeth J.

In: Advances in Group Processes, Vol. 24, 2007, p. 47-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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