Gender-related correlates and predictors of consistent condom use among young adult African-American women: A prospective analysis

G. M. Wingood, Ralph DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study examined the correlates of consistent condom use among African-American women and prospectively evaluated the stability of these significant variables to predict consistent condom use at 3-month follow-up. A sample of 128 African-American women, 18-29 years of age completed a baseline interview and 3 months later completed a similar follow-up interview (n = 100). Compared to women who were inconsistent condom users, women who were consistent condom users were more likely to: have high assertive communication skills (OR = 13), desire not becoming pregnant (OR = 8.6), have high sexual self-control over condom use (OR = 7.6), perceive having control over their partners' use of condoms (OR = 6.6), be younger (OR = 5.8), and report having a partner that was not committed to the relationship (OR = 3.3). Prospective analyses identified baseline level of condom use as the best predictor of condom use at 3-month follow-up. Women who were consistent condom users at baseline were 6.3 times as likely to be consistent condom users at 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, HIV prevention programmes for women need to be gender specific and need to be implemented before high-risk behaviours are established and may be more difficult to modify.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-145
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 1998

Fingerprint

Condoms
African Americans
Young Adult
Interviews
Risk-Taking
Communication
HIV

Keywords

  • African-American women
  • Condom use
  • Gender roles
  • HIV/AIDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Gender-related correlates and predictors of consistent condom use among young adult African-American women: A prospective analysis",
abstract = "The present study examined the correlates of consistent condom use among African-American women and prospectively evaluated the stability of these significant variables to predict consistent condom use at 3-month follow-up. A sample of 128 African-American women, 18-29 years of age completed a baseline interview and 3 months later completed a similar follow-up interview (n = 100). Compared to women who were inconsistent condom users, women who were consistent condom users were more likely to: have high assertive communication skills (OR = 13), desire not becoming pregnant (OR = 8.6), have high sexual self-control over condom use (OR = 7.6), perceive having control over their partners' use of condoms (OR = 6.6), be younger (OR = 5.8), and report having a partner that was not committed to the relationship (OR = 3.3). Prospective analyses identified baseline level of condom use as the best predictor of condom use at 3-month follow-up. Women who were consistent condom users at baseline were 6.3 times as likely to be consistent condom users at 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, HIV prevention programmes for women need to be gender specific and need to be implemented before high-risk behaviours are established and may be more difficult to modify.",
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