Gender justice and CEDAW

The convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women

Sally Merry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Ethnographic analysis carried out over the years, indicates that the critical feature of the CEDAW process is its cultural and educational role: Its capacity to coalesce and express a particular cultural understanding of gender. Like more conventional legal processes, its significance lies in its capacity to shape cultural understandings and to articulate and expand a vision of rights. This is a form of global legality that depends deeply on its texts, not for enforcement but for the production of cultural meanings associated with modernity and the international. It is ultimately dependent on generating political pressure on states from the CEDAW committee, from sympathetic leaders within a country, and from international and national nongovernmental organizations.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)49-75
    Number of pages27
    JournalHawwa
    Volume9
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    discrimination
    justice
    legal process
    legality
    gender
    non-governmental organization
    modernity
    leader

    Keywords

    • CEDAW
    • cultural production
    • gender justice
    • gender violence
    • global legality
    • Human rights
    • postcolonial modernity
    • ratification
    • United Nations
    • Women
    • women's convention

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Gender Studies
    • Cultural Studies
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Gender justice and CEDAW : The convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women. / Merry, Sally.

    In: Hawwa, Vol. 9, No. 1-2, 2011, p. 49-75.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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