Gender differences in HIV-related self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among college students

B. Dekin, Cheryl Healton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A survey of 265 college students was conducted to determine HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and perceived self-efficacy with regard to engaging in HIV-protective behaviors. A self-administered 52-item survey was completed by 265 college students (60% response rate). Resident advisors in college dormitories distributed the survey, returned anonymously. Data were analyzed using SPSS to identify differential responses by gender. Although HIV knowledge was high, perceived self-efficacy differed significantly by gender, with men describing themselves as less able to insist upon condom use (P <.00001). Men were also significantly more likely to report using drugs or alcohol in situations likely to lead to a sexual encounter (P <.001) and to having lower self-efficacy in relation to HIV protection than women in such situations (P <.02). Men were also significantly more likely to believe that monogamy obviates the need to use condoms (P <.01). A substantial number of men (13) and women (14.6) say they do not use condoms because they are protected from unwanted pregnancy by the pill. Gender-specific HIV education and skills-building programs may improve the success of AIDS prevention efforts by confronting and addressing gender differences. The reliance on hormonal methods of birth control alone may be a barrier to condom use for both male and female adolescents and young adults. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): AIDS; HIV; knowledge, attitudes, and practice; gender; condoms; birth control; family planning; teenage pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-66
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1996

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Condoms
HIV
Students
Self Efficacy
Contraception
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Medical Subject Headings
Unwanted Pregnancies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Family Planning Services
Young Adult
Alcohols
Education
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Gender differences in HIV-related self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among college students. / Dekin, B.; Healton, Cheryl.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 4 SUPPL., 1996, p. 61-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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