Gender differences in attitudes toward AIDS clinical trials among urban HIV-infected individuals from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds

M. V. Gwadz, N. R. Leonard, A. Nakagawa, K. Cylar, M. Finkelstein, N. Herzog, M. Tharaken, D. Mildvan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Racial/ethnic minorities and women are under-represented in AIDS clinical trials (ACTs). We examined gender differences in willingness to participate in ACTs among urban HIV-infected individuals (N=286). Sixty percent of participants were male, and most were from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds (55% African-American, 34% Latino/Hispanic, 11% White/other). Knowledge of ACTs was poor. Males and females did not differ substantially in their distrust of AIDS scientists, or in barriers to ACTs. Almost all (87%) were somewhat or very willing to join ACTs. Females were less willing than males to join, including trials testing new medications or new medication combinations. Males and females differed in correlates of willingness to participate in ACTs. Despite long-standing barriers to medical research among minorities and women, willingness to participate was substantial, particularly for men, although the factors that might motivate them to join differed by gender. Women appeared more averse to trials involving new anti-retroviral regimens than men. Gender-specific outreach, behavioural intervention, and social marketing efforts are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)786-794
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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national minority
gender-specific factors
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
Clinical Trials
HIV
Hispanic Americans
Social Marketing
medication
social marketing
medical research
gender
African Americans
Biomedical Research
minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Gender differences in attitudes toward AIDS clinical trials among urban HIV-infected individuals from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds. / Gwadz, M. V.; Leonard, N. R.; Nakagawa, A.; Cylar, K.; Finkelstein, M.; Herzog, N.; Tharaken, M.; Mildvan, D.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 18, No. 7, 01.10.2006, p. 786-794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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