Gender differences in apparent motion perception.

S. Shechter, P. Hillman, S. Hochstein, Robert Shapley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Distance disparity is a strong cue to element correspondence in apparent motion. Using a 2-AFC paradigm we have previously shown that shape similarity also plays a role. We now demonstrate a small gender difference in these effects: women are more sensitive to distance disparity, whereas men are more sensitive to differences in shape. Furthermore, in the competing presence of a shape cue, women's sensitivity to distance decreases while men's sensitivity is unaffected. These observations may be related to putative gender differences in the 'form' and 'motion-spatial relations' cortical pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalPerception
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Motion Perception
Cues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Shechter, S., Hillman, P., Hochstein, S., & Shapley, R. (1991). Gender differences in apparent motion perception. Perception, 20(3), 307-314.

Gender differences in apparent motion perception. / Shechter, S.; Hillman, P.; Hochstein, S.; Shapley, Robert.

In: Perception, Vol. 20, No. 3, 1991, p. 307-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shechter, S, Hillman, P, Hochstein, S & Shapley, R 1991, 'Gender differences in apparent motion perception.', Perception, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 307-314.
Shechter S, Hillman P, Hochstein S, Shapley R. Gender differences in apparent motion perception. Perception. 1991;20(3):307-314.
Shechter, S. ; Hillman, P. ; Hochstein, S. ; Shapley, Robert. / Gender differences in apparent motion perception. In: Perception. 1991 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 307-314.
@article{0eb5bfd6af1447ca8f16ba3711306952,
title = "Gender differences in apparent motion perception.",
abstract = "Distance disparity is a strong cue to element correspondence in apparent motion. Using a 2-AFC paradigm we have previously shown that shape similarity also plays a role. We now demonstrate a small gender difference in these effects: women are more sensitive to distance disparity, whereas men are more sensitive to differences in shape. Furthermore, in the competing presence of a shape cue, women's sensitivity to distance decreases while men's sensitivity is unaffected. These observations may be related to putative gender differences in the 'form' and 'motion-spatial relations' cortical pathways.",
author = "S. Shechter and P. Hillman and S. Hochstein and Robert Shapley",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "307--314",
journal = "Perception",
issn = "0301-0066",
publisher = "Pion Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender differences in apparent motion perception.

AU - Shechter, S.

AU - Hillman, P.

AU - Hochstein, S.

AU - Shapley, Robert

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - Distance disparity is a strong cue to element correspondence in apparent motion. Using a 2-AFC paradigm we have previously shown that shape similarity also plays a role. We now demonstrate a small gender difference in these effects: women are more sensitive to distance disparity, whereas men are more sensitive to differences in shape. Furthermore, in the competing presence of a shape cue, women's sensitivity to distance decreases while men's sensitivity is unaffected. These observations may be related to putative gender differences in the 'form' and 'motion-spatial relations' cortical pathways.

AB - Distance disparity is a strong cue to element correspondence in apparent motion. Using a 2-AFC paradigm we have previously shown that shape similarity also plays a role. We now demonstrate a small gender difference in these effects: women are more sensitive to distance disparity, whereas men are more sensitive to differences in shape. Furthermore, in the competing presence of a shape cue, women's sensitivity to distance decreases while men's sensitivity is unaffected. These observations may be related to putative gender differences in the 'form' and 'motion-spatial relations' cortical pathways.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026294456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026294456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1762873

AN - SCOPUS:0026294456

VL - 20

SP - 307

EP - 314

JO - Perception

JF - Perception

SN - 0301-0066

IS - 3

ER -