Gender and Race Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among New York City Adults: New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES) 2013–2014

Rania Kanchi, Sharon E. Perlman, Claudia Chernov, Winfred Wu, Bahman P. Tabaei, Chau Trinh-Shevrin, Nadia Islam, Azizi Seixas, Jesica Rodriguez-Lopez, Lorna Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While gender and racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have each been well characterized, few studies have comprehensively examined how patterns of major CVD risk factors vary and intersect across gender and major racial/ethnic groups, considered together. Using data from New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013–2014—a population-based, cross-sectional survey of NYC residents ages 20 years and older—we measured prevalence of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and diabetes across gender and race/ethnicity groups for 1527 individuals. We used logistic regression with predicted marginal to estimate age-adjusted prevalence ratio by gender and race/ethnicity groups and assess for potential additive and multiplicative interaction. Overall, women had lower prevalence of CVD risk factors than men, with less hypertension (p = 0.040), lower triglycerides (p < 0.001), higher HDL (p < 0.001), and a greater likelihood of a heart healthy lifestyle, more likely not to smoke and to follow a healthy diet (p < 0.05). When further stratified by race/ethnicity, however, the female advantage was largely restricted to non-Latino white women. Non-Latino black women had significantly higher risk of being overweight or obese, having hypertension, and having diabetes than non-Latino white men or women, or than non-Latino black men (p < 0.05). Non-Latino black women also had higher total cholesterol compared to non-Latino black men (184.4 vs 170.5 mg/dL, p = 0.010). Despite efforts to improve cardiovascular health and narrow disparities, non-Latino black women continue to have a higher burden of CVD risk factors than other gender and racial/ethnic groups. This study highlights the importance of assessing for intersectionality between gender and race/ethnicity groups when examining CVD risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Urban Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 9 2018

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
nutrition
Cardiovascular Diseases
Disease
examination
gender
Health
hypertension
ethnicity
health
Hypertension
Ethnic Groups
chronic illness
ethnic group
intersectionality
Group
Hypercholesterolemia
Smoke
smoking
Triglycerides

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Disparities
  • Gender
  • Intersectionality
  • NYC HANES
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Gender and Race Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among New York City Adults : New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES) 2013–2014. / Kanchi, Rania; Perlman, Sharon E.; Chernov, Claudia; Wu, Winfred; Tabaei, Bahman P.; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Islam, Nadia; Seixas, Azizi; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jesica; Thorpe, Lorna.

In: Journal of Urban Health, 09.07.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kanchi, Rania ; Perlman, Sharon E. ; Chernov, Claudia ; Wu, Winfred ; Tabaei, Bahman P. ; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau ; Islam, Nadia ; Seixas, Azizi ; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jesica ; Thorpe, Lorna. / Gender and Race Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among New York City Adults : New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES) 2013–2014. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2018 ; pp. 1-12.
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