Future directions for pain research in oral and maxillofacial surgery

Findings of the 2005 AAOMS Research Summit

Brian Schmidt, Stephen B. Milam, Ronald Caloss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mechanisms that underlie acute and chronic pain states are complex. There is a growing body of evidence supporting the notion that pain may represent more than a symptom of tissue injury. The concept that some pain states may reflect dramatic physical and biochemical changes in nociceptive pathways (ie, pain is the disease) has been supported by recent studies. With this new information, emerging technologies should provide improved diagnostics based on molecular mechanisms of pain. Furthermore, it is likely that novel therapeutics based upon these mechanisms will finally provide relief for those who suffer from unrelenting pain and improve the quality of care rendered by oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1410-1417
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume63
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Oral Surgery
Pain
Research
Quality of Health Care
Acute Pain
Chronic Pain
Direction compound
Technology
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Surgery

Cite this

Future directions for pain research in oral and maxillofacial surgery : Findings of the 2005 AAOMS Research Summit. / Schmidt, Brian; Milam, Stephen B.; Caloss, Ronald.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 63, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 1410-1417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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