Fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated by layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly techniques

Andre Taylor, Marc Michel, Ryan C. Sekol, Jeremy M. Kizuka, Nicholas A. Kotov, Levi T. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High activity, carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts were synthesized using a supercritical fluid method and a selective heterogeneous nucleation reaction to disperse Pt onto single walled carbon nanotube and carbon fiber supports. These nanocomposite materials were then incorporated into catalyst and gas diffusion layers consisting of polyelectrolytes, i.e., Nafion, polyaniline, and polyethyleneimine using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly techniques. Due to the ultrathin nature and excellent homogeneity characteristics of LBL materials, the LBL nanocomposite catalyst layers (LNCLs) yielded much higher Pt utilizations, 3,198 mW mgpt-1, than membrane electrode assemblies produced using conventional methods (∼800mW mgPt-1). Thinner membranes (100 bilayers) can further improve the performance of the LNCLs and these layers can function as catalyzed gas diffusion layers for the anode and cathode of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3003-3009
Number of pages7
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume18
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 9 2008

Fingerprint

Cell membranes
Self assembly
assemblies
fuel cells
self assembly
Fuel cells
Electrostatics
Nanocomposites
Diffusion in gases
electrostatics
Electrodes
Catalysts
electrodes
Membranes
Polyethyleneimine
Supercritical fluids
Electrocatalysts
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN)
Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)
Polyaniline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Taylor, A., Michel, M., Sekol, R. C., Kizuka, J. M., Kotov, N. A., & Thompson, L. T. (2008). Fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated by layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly techniques. Advanced Functional Materials, 18(19), 3003-3009. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.200701516

Fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated by layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly techniques. / Taylor, Andre; Michel, Marc; Sekol, Ryan C.; Kizuka, Jeremy M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Thompson, Levi T.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 18, No. 19, 09.10.2008, p. 3003-3009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Andre ; Michel, Marc ; Sekol, Ryan C. ; Kizuka, Jeremy M. ; Kotov, Nicholas A. ; Thompson, Levi T. / Fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated by layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly techniques. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 19. pp. 3003-3009.
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