Freezing behavior of single sulfuric acid aerosols suspended in a quadrupole trap

K. L. Carleton, D. M. Sonnenfroh, W. T. Rawlins, B. E. Wyslouzil, S. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The freezing properties of sulfuric acid droplets were studied by suspending single 20- to 30-μm-diameter particles in a quadrupole trap and cooling them to stratospheric temperatures (≥191.5 K). Each particle's dc balance voltage was measured to determine the particle composition as a function of temperature and map out the particle's trajectory relative to the sulfuric acid phase diagram. Angularly resolved optical scattering patterns were monitored to detect freezing events. Particles cooled through the sulfuric acid tetrahydrate region (35-70 wt % H2SO4) did not freeze and remained spherical liquid droplets for several hours. Only particles cooled through the ice-liquid equilibrium region (<35 wt % H2SO4) showed evidence of freezing. This supports previous experimental and field observations that stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols are likely to remain liquid to within a few degrees of the ice frost point.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6025-6033
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume102
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1997

Fingerprint

sulfuric acid
Aerosols
Freezing
freezing
aerosols
quadrupoles
traps
aerosol
Upper atmosphere
Ice
Liquids
ice
liquids
liquid
droplet
frost
particle trajectories
Phase diagrams
Trajectories
Scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Carleton, K. L., Sonnenfroh, D. M., Rawlins, W. T., Wyslouzil, B. E., & Arnold, S. (1997). Freezing behavior of single sulfuric acid aerosols suspended in a quadrupole trap. Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 102(5), 6025-6033.

Freezing behavior of single sulfuric acid aerosols suspended in a quadrupole trap. / Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Wyslouzil, B. E.; Arnold, S.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, Vol. 102, No. 5, 20.03.1997, p. 6025-6033.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carleton, KL, Sonnenfroh, DM, Rawlins, WT, Wyslouzil, BE & Arnold, S 1997, 'Freezing behavior of single sulfuric acid aerosols suspended in a quadrupole trap', Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, vol. 102, no. 5, pp. 6025-6033.
Carleton, K. L. ; Sonnenfroh, D. M. ; Rawlins, W. T. ; Wyslouzil, B. E. ; Arnold, S. / Freezing behavior of single sulfuric acid aerosols suspended in a quadrupole trap. In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics. 1997 ; Vol. 102, No. 5. pp. 6025-6033.
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