France’s liberation era, 1944-47: A social and economic settlement?

Herrick Chapman

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    In popular memory and in textbooks, the Liberation (1944-47) was a founding moment for France’s economy and social order. The first post-war governments launched a nationwide social security system and nationalised utilities, transport, and financial and industrial firms. Economic modernisation was driven by Monnet-style planning and by high-powered civil servants from the new École Nationale d’Administration, assisted by new tools such as INSEE (the national statistical institute) and INED (the demographic institute). To this list could be added economic and social democratisation. Article 1 of the Constitution of the Fourth Republic declared that ‘the law guarantees to women equal rights to men in all domains’. Articles 22 to 39 proclaimed a range of new rights, including a worker’s right to strike and to join (or not join) a union (Article 30), and even to ‘participate, though the intermediary of his delegates, in the collective determination of working conditions and the management of enterprises’ (Article 31); this last provision found practical expression in the establishment of comités d’entreprise in large and medium-sized firms. Contemporary protagonists from the Communists to de Gaulle viewed this as an era of bold beginnings. Even 40 years later, as governments began to sell off nationalised firms or struggled to bring social security costs under control, the image of the Liberation as a founding moment was shared both by neo-liberals who sought to reform or dismantle the post-1944 settlement and by those on the Left who struggled to preserve it.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationThe Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Pages103-120
    Number of pages18
    ISBN (Electronic)9780230222908
    ISBN (Print)9780230521216
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

    Fingerprint

    liberation
    social security
    right to strike
    France
    medium-sized firm
    firm
    civil servant
    social order
    working conditions
    democratization
    textbook
    economics
    modernization
    guarantee
    constitution
    worker
    reform
    planning
    economy
    Law

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)
    • Arts and Humanities(all)

    Cite this

    Chapman, H. (2007). France’s liberation era, 1944-47: A social and economic settlement? In The Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47 (pp. 103-120). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230222908

    France’s liberation era, 1944-47 : A social and economic settlement? / Chapman, Herrick.

    The Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. p. 103-120.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Chapman, H 2007, France’s liberation era, 1944-47: A social and economic settlement? in The Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 103-120. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230222908
    Chapman H. France’s liberation era, 1944-47: A social and economic settlement? In The Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47. Palgrave Macmillan. 2007. p. 103-120 https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230222908
    Chapman, Herrick. / France’s liberation era, 1944-47 : A social and economic settlement?. The Uncertain Foundation: France at the Liberation 1944-47. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. pp. 103-120
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