Fractal facets of turbulence

K. R. Sreenivasan, C. Meneveau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors examine the following questions: (a) Is the turbulent/non-turbulent interface a self-similar fractal, and (if so) what is its fractal dimension? Does this quantity differ from one class of flows to another? (b) Are constant-property surfaces (such as the iso-velocity and iso-concentration surfaces) in fully developed flows fractals? What are their fractal dimensions? (c) Do dissipative structures in fully developed turbulence form a fractal set? What is the fractal dimension of this set? The other feature of this work is that it tries to quantify the seemingly complicated geometric apects of turbulent flows, a feature that has not received its proper share of attention. The overwhelming conclusion of this work is that several aspects of turbulence can be described roughly by fractals, and that their fractal dimensions can be measured.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-386
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Fluid Mechanics
Volume173
StatePublished - Dec 1986

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Fractal dimension
Fractals
flat surfaces
fractals
Turbulence
turbulence
Turbulent flow
Surface properties
turbulent flow
surface properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Fractal facets of turbulence. / Sreenivasan, K. R.; Meneveau, C.

In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 173, 12.1986, p. 357-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sreenivasan, KR & Meneveau, C 1986, 'Fractal facets of turbulence', Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 173, pp. 357-386.
Sreenivasan, K. R. ; Meneveau, C. / Fractal facets of turbulence. In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 1986 ; Vol. 173. pp. 357-386.
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